Bilateral Upper Leg Swelling Symptom, Causes & Questions

Understand your bilateral upper leg swelling symptoms, including 4 causes & common questions.

Bilateral Upper Leg Swelling Symptom Checker

Take a quiz to find out what might be causing your bilateral upper leg swelling

Contents

  1. 4 Possible Causes
  2. Questions Your Doctor May Ask
  3. Statistics
  4. Related Articles

4 Possible Bilateral Upper Leg Swelling Causes

The list below shows results from the use of our quiz by Buoy users who experienced bilateral upper leg swelling. This list does not constitute medical advice and may not accurately represent what you have.

Nephrotic syndrome

Nephrotic syndrome is a disorder of the kidneys that results in too much protein excreted into your urine. It is usually associated with damaged kidneys specifically damage to the kidneys' filters, called glomeruli.

Kidney damage and nephrotic syndrome primarily include albuminur...

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Congestive heart failure

Heart failure is a condition in which the heart is no longer able to effectively pump blood to the rest of the body. Heart failure can affect the right side, left side, or both sides of the heart. It can be subcategorized as "heart failure with preserved ejection f...

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Bilateral Upper Leg Swelling Symptom Checker

Take a quiz to find out what might be causing your bilateral upper leg swelling

Compartment syndrome

Acute compartment syndrome describes the damage done to certain muscle groups of the arms or legs after a traumatic injury.

All of the long muscles are bundled into sections – "compartments" – by the white sheets of strong, tough connective tissue called fascia. If something interferes with circulation so that blood flow is trapped within the compartment, pressure rises because the fascia cannot stretch. This causes serious damage to the muscles and other tissues within the compartment.

Acute compartment syndrome is caused by a broken bone; a crush injury; burns, due to scarred and tightened skin; and bandages or casts applied before an injury has stopped swelling.

Symptoms can rapidly intensify. They include severe pain and tightness in the muscle; tingling or burning sensation; and sometimes numbness and weakness.

Acute compartment syndrome is a medical emergency which can result in loss of the limb. Take the patient to the emergency room or call 9-1-1.

Diagnosis is made through patient history and physical examination.

Treatment involves hospitalization for emergency surgery and, in some cases, skin graft.

Rarity: Rare

Top Symptoms: arm numbness, hand numbness, foot numbness, pain in one leg, thigh numbness

Urgency: Hospital emergency room

Right heart failure (cor pulmonale)

Acute cor pulmonale is also called acute right-sided heart failure and acute RHF. It is the sudden failure of the right ventricle of the heart.

The right ventricle pumps blood out of the heart, into the pulmonary artery, and into the lungs. If the pulmonary artery is blocked, the right ventricle will quickly become overworked and in danger of shutting down. A blood clot, called an embolism, or plaque lining this artery can suddenly cut off blood flow from the heart into the lungs.

Risk factors for acute cor pulmonale include surgery, obesity, smoking, and prolonged immobility. All of these leave the person prone to blood clots and/or plaque in the arteries.

Symptoms include sudden chest pain with rapid heartbeat, pale skin, cold sweat, shortness of breath, and coughing, sometimes with blood.

Acute cor pulmonale is a life-threatening medical emergency. Take the patient to the emergency room or call 9-1-1.

Diagnosis is made through physical examination, blood tests, echocardiogram, and chest x-ray.

Treatment involves oxygen, diuretics, blood-thinning and clot-dissolving medications, and sometimes surgery.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: fatigue, chest pain, shortness of breath on exertion, wheezing, decreased exercise tolerance

Symptoms that never occur with right heart failure (cor pulmonale): severe chest pain

Urgency: Hospital emergency room

Questions Your Doctor May Ask About Bilateral Upper Leg Swelling

To diagnose this condition, your doctor would likely ask the following questions:

  • Have you ever been diagnosed with diabetes?
  • Any fever today or during the last week?
  • Where on your upper leg is this swelling?
  • Do you have a rash?

If you've answered yes to one or more of these questions

Please take a quiz to find out what might be causing your bilateral upper leg swelling. These questions are also covered.

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Bilateral Upper Leg Swelling Symptom Checker Statistics

People who have experienced bilateral upper leg swelling have also experienced:

  • 5% Upper Leg Pain
  • 4% Lower Back Pain
  • 2% Tingling Upper Leg

People who have experienced bilateral upper leg swelling were most often matched with:

  • 42% Compartment Syndrome
  • 28% Nephrotic Syndrome
  • 28% Congestive Heart Failure

People who have experienced bilateral upper leg swelling had symptoms persist for:

  • 30% Less than a week
  • 28% Over a month
  • 22% Less than a day

Source: Aggregated and anonymized results from Buoy Assistant (a.k.a. the quiz).

Bilateral Upper Leg Swelling Symptom Checker

Take a quiz to find out what might be causing your bilateral upper leg swelling