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Learn about your cough-induced vomiting, including causes and common questions. Or get a personalized analysis of your cough-induced vomiting from our A.I. health assistant. At Buoy, we build tools that help you know what’s wrong right now and how to get the right care.

Cough - Induced Vomiting Checker

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Your Cough - Induced Vomiting May Also be Known as:
Puke from coughing
Throwing up from coughing
Vomit from coughing

Top 10 Cough - Induced Vomiting Causes

  1. 1.Influenza

    Influenza, or Flu, is an infection of the airway caused by the flu virus, which passes through the air and enters the body through the nose or mouth. The symptoms are similar to those of a cold, but the flu is usually more serious.

    If your flu-like symptoms are existing for less than 48 hours, it might be helpful to seek care by telephone or in a walk-in-clinic to get a course of oseltamivir (Tamiflu). Most people will get better on their own by drinking lots of fluids and taking an over-the-counter medication such as acetominophen (Tylenol) to help with aches or fever.

    Rarity:
    Common
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, headache, loss of appetite, cough, muscle aches
    Symptoms that never occur with influenza:
    headache resulting from a head injury
    Urgency:
    Phone call or in-person visit
  2. 2.Bacterial Pneumonia

    Bacterial pneumonia is the infection of the lungs with bacteria (as opposed to a fungus or a virus).

    You should go see a doctor within the next day since this diagnosis requires a chest X-ray in addition to a doctor's assessment. Treatment with antibiotics is important to keeping the infection under control, which can become dangerous if it spreads or worsens within the lungs.

    Rarity:
    Common
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, cough, headache, loss of appetite, shortness of breath
    Symptoms that always occur with bacterial pneumonia:
    cough
    Urgency:
    In-person visit
  3. 3.Viral (Norovirus) Infection

    Noroviruses are a group of related viruses that leads to nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and cramps. These viruses cause gastroenteritis, an inflammation of the stomach and intestines. When the diarrhea and/or vomiting is severe, dehydration can occur. Symptoms of dehydration include a dry mouth, dizziness, urinating less frequently and dark urine.

    You can safely treat this condition at home. Make sure you drink plenty of water and fluids (Gatorade, Pediatlyte) to replace what is lost with diarrhea. If symptoms of dehydration occur or you are unable to keep down any liquids, seek care at your primary care physician or an urgent care.

    Rarity:
    Common
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, abdominal pain (stomach ache), nausea, headache, stomach bloating
    Symptoms that always occur with viral (norovirus) infection:
    hidden: gastroenteritis symptoms
    Symptoms that never occur with viral (norovirus) infection:
    severe abdominal pain, throbbing headache, severe headache, tarry stool
    Urgency:
    Self-treatment
  4. 4.Viral (Rotavirus) Infection

    Rotavirus is a virus that causes an infection of the gut, known as gastroenteritis. Symptoms include diarrhea, vomiting and fever. When the diarrhea and/or vomiting is severe, dehydration can occur. Symptoms of dehydration include a dry mouth, dizziness, urinating less frequently and dark urine.

    You can safely treat this condition at home. Make sure you drink plenty of water and fluids to replace what is lost with diarrhea. Eat as normally as possible. If symptoms of dehydration occur, or you are unable to keep down any liquids, seek care at your primary care physician or an urgent care.

    Rarity:
    Rare
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, nausea, abdominal pain (stomach ache), headache, loss of appetite
    Symptoms that always occur with viral (rotavirus) infection:
    hidden: gastroenteritis symptoms
    Symptoms that never occur with viral (rotavirus) infection:
    constipation, tarry stool
    Urgency:
    Self-treatment
  5. 5.Non - Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is a cancer of the lymphatic system, which is part of the immune system. Cells in the lymph nodes or bone marrow grow abnormally and may spread beyond the lymphatic system.

    You should visit your primary care physician to confirm the diagnosis. Afterwards, a referral to a specialist will explain treatment options.

    Rarity:
    Rare
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, abdominal pain (stomach ache), nausea or vomiting, loss of appetite, shortness of breath
    Symptoms that never occur with non-hodgkin lymphoma:
    groin lump that comes and goes, shrinking groin lump, armpit lump that comes and goes, shrinking armpit lump, neck lump that comes and goes, shrinking neck bump
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor

    Cough - Induced Vomiting Checker

    Take a quiz to find out why you’re having cough-induced vomiting.

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  6. 6.Whooping Cough

    Whooping cough is a highly infectious bacterial disease that causes uncontrollable coughing. The name comes from the noise people make when they take a breath after a cough. It causes 12-33% of all chronic coughs in adults and adolescents, even if they're vaccinated.

    You should visit your primary care physician within the next 24 hours. This disease is managed with prescription antibiotics, and it is important to get treated as soon as possible to avoid spreading the infection to others.

    Rarity:
    Rare
    Top Symptoms:
    cough with dry or watery sputum, fever, wheezing, productive cough, coughing fits
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor
  7. 7.Coxsackie b Virus Infection

    Coxsackie B Virus usually doesn't cause any symptoms but can be the cause of nonspecific fever and, in rare cases, lung or heart infections. The disease is most common in children but adults are susceptible too.

    Coxsackie B Virus infection ends on its own and does not even need a true diagnostic test. Treatment is not necessary, but over the counter medication to symptomatically treat pain and fever might be helpful.

    Rarity:
    Uncommon
    Top Symptoms:
    fever, fatigue, headache, loss of appetite, nausea
    Symptoms that always occur with coxsackie b virus infection:
    fever
    Urgency:
    Self-treatment
  8. 8.Viral Pneumonia

    Viral pneumonia is inflammation (irritation and swelling) of the lungs due to infection with a virus. Community-acquired pneumonia is the most common type, which is usually acquired in public areas such as at work, school, or grocery store.

    You should see a care provider to be treated and for evaluation of severity of your symptoms. Viral pneumonia is NOT treated with antibiotics, and you may find over-the-counter medications for pain and fever to be helpful.

    Rarity:
    Uncommon
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, headache, cough, shortness of breath, loss of appetite
    Symptoms that never occur with viral pneumonia:
    unexplained bruising
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor
  9. 9.Condition Causing Abnormal, High - Pitched Breathing

    High-pitched inhaling is called stridor, and requires urgent referral to the ER to see why it's happening

    There may be several explanations for this symptom and its severity, but a healthcare professional should make an assessment as soon as possible because it may be serious.

    Rarity:
    Uncommon
    Top Symptoms:
    high-pitched breathing, severe pelvis pain, arm weakness, chest pain, loss of vision
    Urgency:
    Emergency medical service
  10. 10.Common Cold

    The common cold is a viral infection of the upper respiratory tract.

    The common cold is treated symptomatically. Since this is a viral infection, antibiotics are not effective. You can safely treat the symptoms of this condition with over-the-counter pain relievers, decongestants, antihistamines & cough medicines.

    Rarity:
    Common
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, headache, cough, sore throat, congestion
    Symptoms that never occur with common cold:
    being severely ill, severe muscle aches, rash, severe headache
    Urgency:
    Self-treatment

Questions Your Doctor May Ask About Cough - Induced Vomiting

  • Q.Is your vomiting constant or come-and-go?
  • Q.How long has your vomiting been going on?
  • Q.Any fever today or during the last week?
  • Q.Have you lost your appetite recently?

If you've answered yes to one or more of these questions, check our cough-induced vomiting symptom checker.

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Cough - Induced Vomiting Symptom Checker Statistics

  • People who have experienced cough-induced vomiting have also experienced:

    • 17% Cough
    • 7% Productive Cough
    • 4% Dry Cough
  • People who have experienced cough-induced vomiting had symptoms persist for:

    • 58% Less Than a Day
    • 26% Less Than a Week
    • 6% Over a Month
  • People who have experienced cough-induced vomiting were most often matched with:

    • 18% Influenza
    • 18% Bacterial Pneumonia
    • 16% Viral (Norovirus) Infection

Cough - Induced Vomiting Checker

Take a quiz to find out why you’re having cough-induced vomiting.

Take a quiz