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Learn about your moving less frequently, including causes and common questions. Or get a personalized analysis of your moving less frequently from our A.I. health assistant. At Buoy, we build tools that help you know what’s wrong right now and how to get the right care.

Moving Less Frequently Checker

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Your Moving Less Frequently May Also be Known as:
Moving slowly
Slow movements
Slowing down

Top 8 Moving Less Frequently Causes

  1. 1.Recurrent Depression

    Depression, once diagnosed, can often recur with new episodes. Sometimes these episodes can be similar to ones in the past, sometimes the symptoms can be different. It's good to be aware off the fact that people who had a depression before, remain vulnerable.

    You should discuss your symptoms with your primary care physician or psychiatrist. Resumption of, or adjustment to current treatment is often needed.

    Rarity:
    Common
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, abdominal pain (stomach ache), nausea, stomach bloating, loss of appetite
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor
  2. 2.Mild Chronic Depression (Dysthymia)

    Dysthymia, also called persistent depressive disorder, is a form of depression that is chronic. The causes of dysthymia are complex, and often are a combination of biological, genetic, and environmental factors. Dysthymia can interfere with everyday life, and people with this condition report feeling loss of interest in their daily activities, sadness, hopelessness, and a lack of energy.

    You should visit your primary care physician who will likely coordinate care with a psychologist or psychiatrist. Dysthymia is treated similarly to depression with therapy and antidepressant medication.

    Rarity:
    Uncommon
    Top Symptoms:
    depressed mood, fatigue, irritability, difficulty concentrating, sleep disturbance
    Symptoms that always occur with mild chronic depression (dysthymia):
    depressed mood
    Symptoms that never occur with mild chronic depression (dysthymia):
    severe sadness
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor
  3. 3.Pregnancy - or Childbirth Related Depression

    Depression is a mental disorder in which a person feels constantly sad, hopeless, discouraged, guilty, and loses interest in activities and life on more days than not. These symptoms interfere with daily life, taking care of your baby, work, and friendships. Postpartum or peripartum depression occurs in mothers or future mothers and is linked to pregnancy and childbirth.

    You should visit your primary care physician who will likely coordinate care with a psychologist or other mental health professional. Depression is treated with counseling, therapy and medication.

    Rarity:
    Uncommon
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, depressed mood, difficulty concentrating, impaired social or occupational functioning, loss of appetite
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor
  4. 4.Depression

    Depression is a mental disorder in which a person feels constantly sad, hopeless, discouraged, and loses interest in activities and life on more days than not. These symptoms interfere with daily life, work, and friendships.

    Contact your primary care physician to assess how urgent you should plan a visit to further discuss your symptoms. It is likely a referral to a psychiatrist, psychologist, or other mental health professional will be given. Treatment may include counseling, lifestyle changes, and medication.

    Rarity:
    Common
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, depressed mood, anxiety, irritability, headache
    Symptoms that always occur with depression:
    depressed mood
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor

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  5. 5.Mild Bipolar Disorder i

    Bipolar disorder, which is sometimes called bipolar affective disorder, is a mental condition where a person's mood swings between two extremes. One extreme is called depression, where people feel low, sad, and blue. The other extreme is called mania, where people feel high, elated, overjoyed, and are full of energy.

    You should visit your primary care physician who will coordinate your care with a mental health professional such as a psychiatrist. Bipolar disorder is a serious condition which is treated with prescription medication (usually Lithium).

    Rarity:
    Rare
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, irritability, difficulty concentrating, depressed mood, trouble sleeping
    Symptoms that always occur with mild bipolar disorder i:
    periods of feeling very energetic and needing little sleep
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor
  6. 6.Seasonal Affective Disorder

    Seasonal affective disorder is mood disorder marked by seasonal onset. While summertime sadness is possible, the vast majority of seasonal affective disorder begins in the winter and resolves by summer.

    You should visit your primary care physician to confirm the diagnosis. Your physician may discuss treatment options such as light therapy, antidepressants, and/or talk therapy.

    Rarity:
    Rare
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, loss of appetite, difficulty concentrating, weight gain, sleep disturbance
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor
  7. 7.Canavan Disease

    Canavan disease is an extremely rare genetic disorder. It causes the brain to degenerate into spongy tissue with lots of tiny fluid-filled spaces. Usually this disease is discovered in the first 3 to 6 months of a person's life. It causes progressive destruction of the brain.

    You should visit your primary care physician to get consultation about this serious condition. Unfortunately there is no cure, and treatment is focused on support and symptom management.

    Rarity:
    Rare
    Top Symptoms:
    muscle stiffness/rigidity, developmental delay, moving less frequently, poor control of head movement, low muscle tone
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor
  8. 8.Adrenoleukodystrophy

    Adrenoleukodystrophy describes a family of closely related inherited disorders of fat metabolism. It is a condition that is passed down from parent to child and affects mostly males. People affected with the disease cannot break down certain large fats, which accumulate in the nervous system, adrenal gland, and testes as a result, disrupting normal activity.

    You should visit your primary care physician, who will perform a blood test to rule in the diagnosis. Since this is a genetic condition, no cure is available, but steroids can be used if the adrenal gland is not making enough of its own.

    Rarity:
    Rare
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, hearing loss, feeling confused and not making sense while talking, vomiting, general weakness
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor

Questions Your Doctor May Ask About Moving Less Frequently

  • Q.Any fever today or during the last week?
  • Q.Do you have thoughts of hurting yourself?
  • Q.Have you been feeling more tired than usual, lethargic or fatigued despite sleeping a normal amount?
  • Q.Are you having difficulty concentrating or thinking through daily activities?

If you've answered yes to one or more of these questions, check our moving less frequently symptom checker.

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Moving Less Frequently Symptom Checker Statistics

  • People who have experienced moving less frequently have also experienced:

    • 7% Fatigue
    • 6% Loss of Appetite
    • 4% Headache

Moving Less Frequently Checker

Take a quiz to find out why you’re having moving less frequently.

Take a quiz