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Learn about your numbness in back of thigh, including causes and common questions. Or get a personalized analysis of your numbness in back of thigh from our A.I. health assistant. At Buoy, we build tools that help you know what’s wrong right now and how to get the right care.

Numbness in Back of Thigh Checker

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Your Numbness in Back of Thigh May Also be Known as:
Can't feel hamstring
Hamstring numbness
Hamstring tingling
Loss of sensation on hamstring
Numb hamstring
Pins and needles in hamstring
Pins and needles on hamstring
Tingling sensation on hamstring

Top 7 Numbness in Back of Thigh Causes

  1. 1.Beriberi (Adult)

    A low level of vitamin B1 (thiamin) can cause damage to the heart, brain and nerves. This can result in symptoms like weakness, amnesia, nerve pain and symptoms of heart failure like swelling of limbs and shortness of breath.

    You should seek immediate medical care at an ER. You may need to be admitted to the hospital to get treatment with vitamin B1 via drip in.

    Rarity:
    Rare
    Top Symptoms:
    shortness of breath, abdominal pain (stomach ache), chest pain, anxiety, distal numbness
    Urgency:
    Hospital emergency room
  2. 2.Viral (Rotavirus) Infection

    Rotavirus is a virus that causes an infection of the gut, known as gastroenteritis. Symptoms include diarrhea, vomiting and fever. When the diarrhea and/or vomiting is severe, dehydration can occur. Symptoms of dehydration include a dry mouth, dizziness, urinating less frequently and dark urine.

    You can safely treat this condition at home. Make sure you drink plenty of water and fluids to replace what is lost with diarrhea. Eat as normally as possible. If symptoms of dehydration occur, or you are unable to keep down any liquids, seek care at your primary care physician or an urgent care.

    Rarity:
    Rare
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, nausea, abdominal pain (stomach ache), headache, loss of appetite
    Symptoms that always occur with viral (rotavirus) infection:
    hidden: gastroenteritis symptoms
    Symptoms that never occur with viral (rotavirus) infection:
    constipation, tarry stool
    Urgency:
    Self-treatment
  3. 3.Piriformis Syndrome

    Piriformis syndrome is a condition when a muscle spanning the lower spine to the top of the thighbone presses upon the sciatic nerve, causing pain and numbness.

    You should visit your primary care physician, who would perform a physical exam, looking for other possible causes of your symptoms. Treatment involves NSAIDs (Ibuprofen), massage, and physical therapy.

    Rarity:
    Common
    Top Symptoms:
    pelvis pain, butt pain, pain when passing stools, leg numbness, back pain that shoots down the leg
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor

    Numbness in Back of Thigh Checker

    Take a quiz to find out why you’re having numbness in back of thigh.

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  4. 4.Coxsackie b Virus Infection

    Coxsackie B Virus usually doesn't cause any symptoms but can be the cause of nonspecific fever and, in rare cases, lung or heart infections. The disease is most common in children but adults are susceptible too.

    Coxsackie B Virus infection ends on its own and does not even need a true diagnostic test. Treatment is not necessary, but over the counter medication to symptomatically treat pain and fever might be helpful.

    Rarity:
    Uncommon
    Top Symptoms:
    fever, fatigue, headache, loss of appetite, nausea
    Symptoms that always occur with coxsackie b virus infection:
    fever
    Urgency:
    Self-treatment
  5. 5.Viral (Norovirus) Infection

    Noroviruses are a group of related viruses that leads to nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and cramps. These viruses cause gastroenteritis, an inflammation of the stomach and intestines. When the diarrhea and/or vomiting is severe, dehydration can occur. Symptoms of dehydration include a dry mouth, dizziness, urinating less frequently and dark urine.

    You can safely treat this condition at home. Make sure you drink plenty of water and fluids (Gatorade, Pediatlyte) to replace what is lost with diarrhea. If symptoms of dehydration occur or you are unable to keep down any liquids, seek care at your primary care physician or an urgent care.

    Rarity:
    Common
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, abdominal pain (stomach ache), nausea, headache, stomach bloating
    Symptoms that always occur with viral (norovirus) infection:
    hidden: gastroenteritis symptoms
    Symptoms that never occur with viral (norovirus) infection:
    severe abdominal pain, throbbing headache, severe headache, tarry stool
    Urgency:
    Self-treatment
  6. 6.Brain Tumor or Mass

    A brain lesion can be cancerous or non-cancerous. Nonetheless, they are a potentially serious issue and should be discussed with a physician.

    You should seek care today, since your symptoms indicate that something serious might be going on. In order to diagnose a brain lesion, imaging must be conducted. It is likely you will be sent to a brain specialist.

    Rarity:
    Rare
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, headache, nausea, loss of appetite, irritability
    Symptoms that always occur with brain tumor or mass:
    hidden: any focal neuro sign
    Urgency:
    In-person visit
  7. 7.Herniated (Slipped) Disk in the Lower Back

    The backbone, or spine, is made up of 26 bones called vertebrae. In between the bones are soft disks filled with a jelly-like substance. These disks cushion the vertebrae and keep them in place. Although people talk about a slipped disk, nothing actually slips out of place. The outer shell of the disk ruptures, and the jelly-like substance bulges out. It may be pressing on a nerve, which is what causes the pain.A slipped disk is more likely to happen due to strain on the back, such as during heavy lifting, and older individuals are at higher risk.

    For treatment of a slipped disk, you should consult with your primary care physician (PCP). Your doctor will perform a thorough physical examination to localize the slipped disk and rule out dangerous complications. Most people do not require surgery for a slipped disk. Treatment involves pain relief with an over-the-counter pain medication such as ibuprofen (Advil) and/or acetaminophen (Tylenol), using heat treatments, and keeping active. It is best to avoid sitting still for long periods. Walking or swimming may help as well.

    Rarity:
    Common
    Top Symptoms:
    lower back pain, moderate back pain, back pain that shoots down the leg, back pain that gets worse when sitting, leg weakness
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor

Questions Your Doctor May Ask About Numbness in Back of Thigh

  • Q.Is your upper leg numbness constant or come-and-go?
  • Q.Have you been feeling more tired than usual, lethargic or fatigued despite sleeping a normal amount?
  • Q.Is your hip numbness constant or come-and-go?
  • Q.Have you vomited?

If you've answered yes to one or more of these questions, check our numbness in back of thigh symptom checker.

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Numbness in Back of Thigh Symptom Checker Statistics

  • People who have experienced numbness in back of thigh have also experienced:

    • 6% Facial Numbness
    • 6% Toe Numbness
    • 6% Cold Hands
  • People who have experienced numbness in back of thigh had symptoms persist for:

    • 34% Less Than a Day
    • 31% Over a Month
    • 20% Less Than a Week
  • People who have experienced numbness in back of thigh were most often matched with:

    • 33% Beriberi (Adult)
    • 33% Viral (Rotavirus) Infection
    • 33% Piriformis Syndrome
  • Source: Aggregated and anonymized results from visits to the Buoy AI health assistant (check it out by clicking on “Take Quiz”).

Numbness in Back of Thigh Checker

Take a quiz to find out why you’re having numbness in back of thigh.

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