Welcome to Buoy Health

Learn about your pink/blood-tinged urine, including causes and common questions. Or get a personalized analysis of your pink/blood-tinged urine from our A.I. health assistant. At Buoy, we build tools that help you know what’s wrong right now and how to get the right care.

Pink / Blood - Tinged Urine Checker

Take a quiz to find out why you’re having pink/blood-tinged urine.

Take a quiz
Your Pink / Blood - Tinged Urine May Also be Known as:
Blood in urine
Bloody urine
Peeing blood
Pink pee
Pink urine
Urine has blood in it

Top 10 Pink / Blood - Tinged Urine Causes

  1. 1.Urinary Tract Infection

    In women, the opening to the urethra (the tube that carries urine from the bladder to the outside of the body) is very close to the anus, and bacteria from the anus can easily escape and travel up the urethra. These bacteria can infect the bladder, and cause what is known as a urinary tract infection (UTI).

    You should go to your doctor, an urgent care, or a walk-in clinic to be treated. UTIs must be treated with antibiotics. It is important to get treated as soon as possible to avoid the infection from becoming worse and spreading. To prevent future UTIs, urinate frequently, wipe from front to back, and urinate after sex to rinse out bacteria.

    Rarity:
    Common
    Top Symptoms:
    abdominal cramps (stomach cramps), pelvis pain, sudden urgency to urinate, urinary changes, abdominal pain (stomach ache)
    Symptoms that always occur with urinary tract infection:
    hidden: urinary changes: atrophy or inflammation
    Urgency:
    Phone call or in-person visit
  2. 2.Chronic Kidney Disease

    Chronic kidney disease, also known as chronic renal failure, is a disorder caused by gradual loss of kidney function. It is most common in elderly individuals.

    You should make an appointment with your primary care physician to discuss your symptoms as soon as possible.

    Rarity:
    Common
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, difficulty concentrating, loss of appetite, decreased sex drive, unintentional weight loss
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor
  3. 3.Urethritis

    Urethritis is an inflammation of the urethra, which is the tube that carries urine away from the bladder.

    You should visit your physician for an examination. It is likely antibiotics will be used for treatment.

    Rarity:
    Common
    Top Symptoms:
    painful urination, penis pain, fluid leaking, pink/blood-tinged urine, cloudy urine
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor
  4. 4.Kidney Infection (Pyelonephritis)

    Pyelonephritis is the medical term for a kidney infection. This can arise as a result of a bladder infection that travels upstream. A kidney infection is usually bacterial in nature, and can cause pain on the side of the stomach, high fever, nausea, and blood in the urine.

    You should visit your ER. Pyelonephritis is caused by bacteria and, therefore, needs to be treated with prescription antibiotics.

    Rarity:
    Uncommon
    Top Symptoms:
    abdominal pain (stomach ache), nausea, pelvis pain, back pain, fever
    Symptoms that never occur with kidney infection (pyelonephritis):
    mid back pain from an injury
    Urgency:
    Hospital emergency room
  5. 5.Kidney Stone

    A kidney stone is a solid piece of material that forms in the kidney from substances in the urine. Most kidney stones pass out of the body without help from a doctor. But sometimes a stone will not go away. It may get stuck in the urinary tract, block the flow of urine and cause great pain.

    Kidney stones can be painful, so go to the nearest urgent care center or emergency room. The course of treatment depends on the size of the stone. Small stones can pass out of the body without any treatment, which can take two days to four weeks. You can help this process by drinking plenty of water to increase the flow of urine. Strong painkillers can also help with the pain. If a stone is stuck in a tube (ureter), your doctor might recommend a medication called an alpha-blocker, which can help make the tube bigger and thus help the stone to pass.Larger stones might not pass on their own, and thus surgery or shock wave therapy might be used. Shock wave therapy uses shock waves to break up stones into small pieces that can pass out of the body.

    Rarity:
    Uncommon
    Top Symptoms:
    nausea, abdominal pain that comes and goes, diarrhea, pelvis pain, vomiting
    Symptoms that always occur with kidney stone:
    hidden: abdomen or flank pain
    Urgency:
    Hospital emergency room

    Pink / Blood - Tinged Urine Checker

    Take a quiz to find out why you’re having pink/blood-tinged urine.

    Take a quiz
  6. 6.Acute Postinfectious Glomerulonephritis

    The kidneys are a pair of important organs that lie near the spine whose function is to filter blood. There are about 1 million glomeruli in each kidney, which are tiny balls of thin blood vessels where there filtration takes place. After an infection anywhere in the body, especially a streptococcal infection (strep throat), these glomeruli may become inflamed.

    You should visit your primary care physician within the next 24 hours. Prescription medications are needed to take care of the inflammation as well as any infection if it is still present. The kidney is an important organ and needs to be taken care of as soon as possible!

    Rarity:
    Rare
    Top Symptoms:
    headache, nausea, loss of appetite, vomiting, fatigue
    Urgency:
    Hospital emergency room
  7. 7.Bladder Cancer

    The bladder is a hollow organ in your lower abdomen that stores urine. Bladder cancer, which occurs in the lining of the bladder, is the sixth most common type of cancer in the United States.

    You should visit your primary care physician who will coordinate your care with a cancer specialist (oncologist). Early bladder cancer is usually confined to the superficial lining, and treatment is for the most part easy and curative.

    Rarity:
    Rare
    Top Symptoms:
    abdominal pain (stomach ache), constipation, pelvis pain, frequent urination, side pain
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor
  8. 8.Immune Thrombocytopenia

    Platelets are tiny cells in the blood that help form blood clots and seal minor cuts and wounds. Immune thrombocytopenia, also known as immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), is a condition where there are not enough platelets in the blood, causing easy bruising and tiny reddish purple dots on the skin from bleeding under the surface.

    You should visit your primary care physician to determine the severity of your ITP, and plan a course of treatment if needed. Treatment is focused on raising the platelet count to prevent excessive bleeding.

    Rarity:
    Rare
    Top Symptoms:
    being severely ill, rectal bleeding, red stool, unexplained/excessive bleeding from cuts or wounds, pink/blood-tinged urine
    Symptoms that always occur with immune thrombocytopenia:
    being severely ill
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor
  9. 9.Hemophilia a

    Hemophilia A is an inherited (genetic) disorder which causes the blood to have a deficiency or absence of coagulation factor VIII, which is a protein that is needed to create blood clots. This can result in bleeding that starts on its own, or uncontrollable bleeding after trauma or surgery.

    You should visit your primary care physician who will refer you to a hemophilia treatment center. Treatment is with medication and avoidance of trauma that can cause uncontrollable bleeding.

    Rarity:
    Rare
    Top Symptoms:
    spontaneous shoulder pain, difficulty moving the shoulder, unexplained/excessive bleeding from cuts or wounds, pink/blood-tinged urine, rectal bleeding
    Symptoms that always occur with hemophilia a:
    unexplained/excessive bleeding from cuts or wounds
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor
  10. 10.Painful Bladder Syndrome (Interstitial Cystitis)

    Painful bladder syndrome, also known as interstitial cystitis (IC), is a chronic condition that causes inflammation, discomfort, or pain in the bladder and a need to urinate frequently and urgently.

    You schedule an appointment with your doctor, as they will be able to coordinate appropriate care. Treatments include avoiding foods that make the symptoms work, as well as physical therapy and bladder training.

    Rarity:
    Rare
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, abdominal cramps (stomach cramps), pelvis pain, depressed mood, sudden urgency to urinate
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor

Questions Your Doctor May Ask About Pink / Blood - Tinged Urine

  • Q.Any fever today or during the last week?
  • Q.Do you feel pain when you urinate?
  • Q.Have you experienced any nausea?
  • Q.Are you currently sexually active?

If you've answered yes to one or more of these questions, check our pink/blood-tinged urine symptom checker.

Take a quiz

Pink / Blood - Tinged Urine Symptom Checker Statistics

  • People who have experienced pink/blood-tinged urine have also experienced:

    • 7% Painful Urination
    • 4% Abdominal Pain (Stomach Ache)
    • 4% Bloody Vaginal Discharge
  • People who have experienced pink/blood-tinged urine were most often matched with:

    • 37% Urinary Tract Infection
    • 19% Chronic Kidney Disease
    • 6% Urethritis

Pink / Blood - Tinged Urine Checker

Take a quiz to find out why you’re having pink/blood-tinged urine.

Take a quiz