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Learn about your wateriness in both eyes, including causes and common questions. Or get a personalized analysis of your wateriness in both eyes from our A.I. health assistant. At Buoy, we build tools that help you know what’s wrong right now and how to get the right care.

Wateriness in Both Eyes Checker

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Your Wateriness in Both Eyes May Also be Known as:
Abnormal cry
Cry a lot
Crying a lot
Crying all the time
Crying more frequently
Crying more than usual
Excessive crying
Increased crying
Tearful
Teariness

Top 10 Wateriness in Both Eyes Causes

  1. 1.Recurrent Cluster Headache

    A cluster headache is a type of recurring headache that is moderate to severe in intensity. It is often one-sided head pain that may involve tearing of the eyes and a stuffy nose. Attacks can occur regularly for 1 week and up to 1 year. Each period of attacks (i.e. each cluster) is separated by pain-free periods that last at least 1 month or longer. Other common headaches may also occur during these cluster-free periods.

    You should visit your primary care physician to discuss symptoms, especially if the headaches are worsening or happening more frequently. Cluster headaches are diagnosed purely by history. Treatment options include extra oxygen and prescription medications.

    Rarity:
    Uncommon
    Top Symptoms:
    nausea, severe headache, throbbing headache, congestion, sensitivity to light
    Symptoms that always occur with recurrent cluster headache:
    severe headache
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor
  2. 2.Cluster Headache (New Onset)

    A cluster headache is a type of headache that is moderate to severe in intensity. It is often one-sided head pain that may involve tearing of the eyes and a stuffy nose. Attacks occur regularly for 1 week to 1 year. The attacks are separated by pain-free periods that last at least 1 month or longer. Cluster headaches may be confused with other common types of headaches such as migraines, sinus headache, and tension headache.

    You should visit your primary care physician to discuss symptoms, especially if the headaches are worsening or happening more frequently. Cluster headaches are diagnosed purely by history. Treatment options include extra oxygen and prescription medications.

    Rarity:
    Uncommon
    Top Symptoms:
    nausea, new headache, severe headache, throbbing headache, sensitivity to light
    Symptoms that always occur with cluster headache (new onset):
    severe headache, new headache
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor
  3. 3.Cluster Headache

    A cluster headache is a type of recurring headache that is moderate to severe in intensity. It is often one-sided head pain that may involve tearing of the eyes and a stuffy nose. Attacks can occur regularly for 1 week and up to 1 year. Each period of attacks (i.e. each cluster) is separated by pain-free periods that last at least 1 month or longer. Other common headaches may also occur during these cluster-free periods.

    You should visit your primary care physician to discuss symptoms, especially if the headaches are worsening or happening more frequently. Cluster headaches are diagnosed purely by history. Treatment options include extra oxygen and prescription medications.

    Rarity:
    Uncommon
    Top Symptoms:
    severe headache, nausea, sensitivity to light, throbbing headache, history of headaches
    Symptoms that always occur with cluster headache:
    severe headache
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor
  4. 4.Anterior Uveitis

    Uveitis is the inflammation of of the blood vessels between the back and the front of the eye. "Anterior" uveitis is inflammation of the front of the eye: the iris (the round hole that light goes through) and the ciliary body (the muscles and connective tissue behind the eye's surface). Uveitis can affect adults and children, and there's typically no cause that can be identified.

    You should go to the ER or walk-in ophthalmology clinic immediately. You cannot shrug off this "pink eye" because there's a possibility of vision loss without treatment. You must see an ophthalmologist within 24 hours for follow-up after your initial treatment.

    Rarity:
    Rare
    Top Symptoms:
    blurry vision, sensitivity to light, constant eye pain, eye redness, pain in one eye
    Symptoms that always occur with anterior uveitis:
    constant eye pain
    Urgency:
    Hospital emergency room
  5. 5.Sarcoidosis

    Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disease that most often affects the lungs and skin, but can als affect the joints.

    You should visit your physician to discuss your symptoms when convenient.

    Rarity:
    Rare
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, headache, shortness of breath, loss of appetite, joint pain
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor

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  6. 6.Welder's or Tanning Bed Burn of the Eyes

    A welder's or tanning bed burn is damage to the eye from high-intensity ultraviolet (UV) light, like a sunlamp or welder's arc.

    You should go to the nearest urgent care center, where a doctor can perform a complete eye examination, apply pain-relieving eye drops, and prescribe cold compresses, rest, and ibuprofen for pain relief.

    Rarity:
    Rare
    Top Symptoms:
    eye redness, wateriness in both eyes, pain in both eyes
    Urgency:
    In-person visit
  7. 7.Contact Lens - Related Eye Infection

    Millions of people wear contact lens daily without issue; however, there is a risk of infection. Often, infection is avoidable by keeping lenses clean.

    You should visit an urgent care clinic for an eye exam. It is likely antibiotics will be prescribed.

    Rarity:
    Rare
    Top Symptoms:
    eye redness, constant eye redness, wateriness in both eyes, sensitivity to light, eye redness
    Symptoms that always occur with contact lens-related eye infection:
    eye redness, constant eye redness
    Urgency:
    In-person visit
  8. 8.Vernal Conjunctivitis

    Vernal conjunctivitis is long-term (chronic) swelling (inflammation) of the outer lining of the eyes due to an allergic reaction. Vernal conjunctivitis often occurs in people with a strong family history of allergies, such as allergic rhinitis, asthma, and eczema.

    You should visit your primary care physician, where he/she will look at your eyes to inspect for the telltale signs of vernal conjunctivitis. Typical treatments are anti-histamine eye drops, which can be found over-the-counter.

    Rarity:
    Rare
    Top Symptoms:
    eye redness, wateriness in both eyes, eye itch, sensitivity to light, burning eye(s)
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor
  9. 9.Retinal Detachment

    The retina is a layer of tissue in the eye. When the retina detaches, its normal position is disrupted causing vision changes.

    You should visit the emergency room immediately as this can cause permanent vision loss. If possible, visit an eye hospital's emergency room.

    Rarity:
    Rare
    Top Symptoms:
    floating spots in vision
    Symptoms that always occur with retinal detachment:
    floating spots in vision
    Symptoms that never occur with retinal detachment:
    eye pain, eye redness, eye itch, wateriness in both eyes
    Urgency:
    Hospital emergency room
  10. 10.Sinus Headache

    Sinus headaches are very common. When compared to a normal headache, this pain is generally around the eyes, sinuses, and upper cheeks.

    Your sinus headache is of normal variation and can be treated at home with an over-the-counter pain reliever.

    Rarity:
    Common
    Top Symptoms:
    headache, mucous dripping in the back of the throat, headache that worsens when head moves, facial fullness or pressure, sinus pain
    Symptoms that always occur with sinus headache:
    headache
    Symptoms that never occur with sinus headache:
    fever, being severely ill, sore throat, muscle aches, cough, drooping eyelid, wateriness in both eyes, headache resulting from a head injury, severe headache, unexplained limb pain
    Urgency:
    Self-treatment

Questions Your Doctor May Ask About Wateriness in Both Eyes

  • Q.Are you experiencing a headache?
  • Q.Any fever today or during the last week?
  • Q.Have you experienced any nausea?
  • Q.Have you lost your appetite recently?

If you've answered yes to one or more of these questions, check our wateriness in both eyes symptom checker.

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Wateriness in Both Eyes Symptom Checker Statistics

  • People who have experienced wateriness in both eyes have also experienced:

    • 5% Depressed Mood
    • 5% Frequent Mood Swings
    • 5% Teafulness
  • Source: Aggregated and anonymized results from visits to the Buoy AI health assistant (check it out by clicking on “Take Quiz”).

Wateriness in Both Eyes Checker

Take a quiz to find out why you’re having wateriness in both eyes.

Take a quiz