Symptoms A-Z

What is Apraxia: Common Symptoms, Causes & Treatments

Understand your apraxia symptoms with Buoy, including 9 causes and treatment options concerning your apraxia.

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Contents

  1. 9 Possible Apraxia Causes
  2. Questions Your Doctor May Ask
  3. Statistics

9 Possible Apraxia Causes

The list below shows results from the use of our quiz by Buoy users who experienced apraxia. This list does not constitute medical advice and may not accurately represent what you have.

Traumatic brain injury

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: new headache, irritability, clear runny nose, vision changes, general numbness

Symptoms that always occur with traumatic brain injury: head injury

Urgency: Emergency medical service

Stroke or tia (transient ischemic attack)

Transient ischemic attack, or TIA, is sometimes called a "mini stroke" or a "warning stroke." Any stroke means that blood flow somewhere in the brain has been blocked by a clot.

Risk factors include smoking, obesity, and cardiovascular disease, though anyone can experience a TIA.

Symptoms are "transient," meaning they come and go within minutes because the clot dissolves or moves on its own. Stroke symptoms include weakness, numbness, and paralysis on one side of the face and/or body; slurred speech; abnormal vision; and sudden, severe headache.

A TIA does not cause permanent damage because it is over quickly. However, the patient must get treatment because a TIA is a warning that a more damaging stroke is likely to occur. Take the patient to the emergency room or call 9-1-1.

Diagnosis is made through patient history; physical examination; CT scan or MRI; and electrocardiogram.

Treatment includes anticoagulant medication to prevent further clots. Surgery to clear some of the arteries may also be recommended.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: dizziness, leg numbness, arm numbness, new headache, stiff neck

Symptoms that never occur with stroke or tia (transient ischemic attack): bilateral weakness

Urgency: Emergency medical service

Alzheimer's disease

Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurological disorder that slowly destroys memory and the ability to think clearly. As symptoms worsen, patients are often unable to perform basic tasks.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: trouble sleeping, forgetfulness, anxiety, aggression or confusion, anxiety, irritability, depressed mood

Symptoms that always occur with alzheimer's disease: forgetfulness, anxiety, aggression or confusion

Urgency: Primary care doctor

Wernicke-korsakoff syndrome

Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome, or WKS, is a neurologic disorder. The names represent the acute stage of the illness, called Wernicke's Encephalopathy, and the chronic stage, called Korsakoff Syndrome.

WKS is caused by a deficiency of thiamine, or vitamin B1. It is most often seen in alcoholics; anyone who has had a poor diet, eating disorder, or weight-loss surgery; and those with serious illness such as cancer or AIDS.

Acute symptoms are primarily physical and include abnormal, uncoordinated walking and standing; flickering eye movements called nystagmus; and damage to the heart and nervous system. There may also be profound drowsiness that can lead to coma.

Chronic symptoms are primarily mental and include short-term memory loss and dementia-like behavior.

The acute stages of WKS can be a life-threatening medical emergency. Take the patient to the emergency room or call 9-1-1.

Diagnosis is made through physical examination and blood tests.

Treatment involves simply adding thiamine supplements to the diet, as well as treating any remaining symptoms to aid in recovery.

Rarity: Rare

Top Symptoms: nausea or vomiting, leg numbness, feeling confused and not making sense while talking, amnesia, jerky, unsteady, or uncoordinated walk

Urgency: Hospital emergency room

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Bacterial meningitis

Meningitis describes inflammation of the meninges, the layers of membranes that surround the brain and spinal cord. Viruses, fungi, bacteria, and other rare causes can lead to meningitis. Streptococcus, Neisseria, Listeria, and Haemophilus are common bacterial causes of meningitis.

Symptoms escalate quickly and may include a headache, fever, stiff neck, nausea and vomiting, confusion, and sensitivity to light. Bacterial meningitis can lead to sepsis and permanent brain damage and is a life-threatening medical emergency. If it is suspected, take the patient to the emergency room or call 911.

Antibiotics are the predominant treatment for bacterial meningitis. Vaccines can also help protect against bacterial meningitis.

Rarity: Ultra rare

Top Symptoms: fatigue, headache, nausea, being severely ill, fever

Symptoms that always occur with bacterial meningitis: being severely ill

Urgency: Emergency medical service

Brain tumor or mass

In medical terms, "mass" and "tumor" mean the same thing: the unexplained, out-of-place growth of tissue anywhere in the body, including the brain.

The cause of any sort of brain tumor is unknown. Some originate in the brain, while others spread from cancers growing in other parts of the body.

Symptoms may include increasing headaches; nausea and vomiting; blurred or double vision; loss of sensation in an arm or leg; loss of balance; confusion; speech difficulties; or seizures.

If symptoms persist, it is important to see a medical provider so that any treatment can begin as soon as possible.

Diagnosis is made through neurological examination, CT scan, and/or MRI.

If the mass or tumor is found to be benign, that means it is not cancer and not harmful. It may or may not be treated.

If it is malignant, that means it is cancer and must be treated. This will involve some combination of surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy, followed by specialized therapy to help with recovery.

Rarity: Rare

Top Symptoms: fatigue, headache, nausea, loss of appetite, irritability

Symptoms that always occur with brain tumor or mass: focal neurological symptoms

Urgency: In-person visit

Subdural hematoma

A subdural hematoma (SDH) is a clot or a pool of blood between the surface of the brain and the dura mater, the brain’s tough outer covering. This is typically due to the stretching and tearing of veins on the brain’s surface. These veins rupture when a head injury suddenly jolts or shakes the brain.

Rarity: Rare

Top Symptoms: headache, new headache, being severely ill, vision changes, lightheadedness

Symptoms that always occur with subdural hematoma: head injury, being severely ill

Urgency: Hospital emergency room

Cerebral venous thrombosis

Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT,) or cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) refers to a blood clot in certain veins of the brain.

There are two layers of material that form the lining between the skull and the brain. The occasional open spaces, or sinuses, between these two layers have veins running through them to drain blood and spinal fluid from the brain.

Cerebral venous thrombosis means that a blood clot (thrombosis) has formed somewhere within the veins of these sinuses.

This condition is caused by a congenital malformation in the brain; pregnancy; use of oral contraceptives; meningitis; use of steroids; and trauma to the head.

Symptoms include headache; nausea and vomiting; mental confusion; changes in vision; difficulty walking, moving or speaking; seizures; and coma. CVT is a life-threatening medical emergency. Take the patient to the emergency room or call 9-1-1.

Diagnosis is made through physical examination; CT scan or MRI; blood tests; and sometimes a lumbar puncture (spinal tap.)

Treatment includes anticoagulant medication to destroy the clot, followed by any rehabilitation that may be needed.

Rarity: Ultra rare

Top Symptoms: fatigue, headache, nausea or vomiting, loss of appetite, being severely ill

Symptoms that always occur with cerebral venous thrombosis: being severely ill

Urgency: Emergency medical service

Ataxia-telangiectasia (louis-bar syndrome)

Ataxia-Telangiectasia is a rare, brain degenerative, inherited disease causing disability. Ataxia refers to poor coordination and telangiectasia to small dilated blood vessels.

Rarity: Rare

Top Symptoms: difficulty walking, difficulty with coordination, numbness or tingling sensations in skin, trouble swallowing, jerky, unsteady, or uncoordinated walk

Symptoms that always occur with ataxia-telangiectasia (louis-bar syndrome): difficulty with coordination

Urgency: Primary care doctor

Questions Your Doctor May Ask About Apraxia

To diagnose this condition, your doctor would likely ask the following questions:

  • Are you experiencing a headache?
  • Are you feeling irritable (easily made upset)?
  • Are you feeling less alert than normal?
  • Do you currently smoke?

The above questions are also covered by our A.I. Health Assistant.

If you've answered yes to one or more of these questions

Take a quiz to find out why you're having apraxia

Apraxia Symptom Checker Statistics

People who have experienced apraxia have also experienced:

  • 7% Fatigue
  • 5% Loss Of Interest In Things That Bring You Joy
  • 5% Difficulty Concentrating

People who have experienced apraxia were most often matched with:

  • 41% Traumatic Brain Injury
  • 41% Stroke Or Tia (Transient Ischemic Attack)
  • 17% Alzheimer'S Disease

People who have experienced apraxia had symptoms persist for:

  • 38% Over a month
  • 27% Less than a day
  • 21% Less than a week

Source: Aggregated and anonymized results from visits to the Buoy AI health assistant (check it out by clicking on “Take Quiz”).

Apraxia Symptom Checker

Take a quiz to find out why you're having apraxia