Read below about change in urine color, including causes and common questions. Or get a personalized analysis of your change in urine color from our A.I. health assistant. At Buoy, we build tools that help you know what’s wrong right now and how to get the right care.

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A.I. Health Assistant Causes for Change in Urine Color

Updated on Aug. 29, 2018

The list below shows results from the use of our A.I. Health Assistant by Buoy users who experienced change in urine color. This list does not constitute medical advice.

  1. 1.Dehydration

    Dehydration occurs when the body does not have fluid to function properly, because of decreased intake or increased losses like vomiting and diarrhea. Symptoms of dehydration include extreme thirst, dark urine, fatigue, and dizziness.

    With rehydration, symptoms resolve completely.

    Rarity:
    Rare
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, dizziness, vomiting or diarrhea, racing heart beat, being severely ill
    Urgency:
    Hospital emergency room
  2. 2.Urinary Tract Infection

    In women, the opening to the urethra (the tube that carries urine from the bladder to the outside of the body) is very close to the anus, and bacteria from the anus can easily escape and travel up the urethra. These bacteria can infect the bladder, and cause what is known as a urinary tract infection (UTI).

    Symptoms most often go away within 24 to 48 hours after treatment begins.

    Rarity:
    Common
    Top Symptoms:
    abdominal cramps (stomach cramps), pelvis pain, sudden urgency to urinate, signs of urinary tract inflammation, urinary changes
    Symptoms that always occur with urinary tract infection:
    signs of urinary tract inflammation
    Urgency:
    Phone call or in-person visit
  3. 3.Kidney Stone

    A kidney stone is a solid piece of material that forms in the kidney from substances in the urine. Most kidney stones pass out of the body without help from a doctor. But sometimes a stone will not go away. It may get stuck in the urinary tract, block the flow of urine and cause great pain.

    The prognosis for a kidney stone is good, as it is not a chronic condition. Once the stone has passed, the pain will go away. However, if you have had a kidney stone, you have about a 1 in 2 chance of getting another one in five to seven years. This can be prevented by: 1. Drinking more than 2 liters (2.11 quarts) of water a day. 2. Eating a healthy diet with foods rich in calcium such as milk and other dairy products, peas and beans, leafy green vegetables, nuts, and bony fish like sardines and salmon. 3. Avoiding use of lots of salt in cooking. 4. Eating more vegetables, as they help make urine less acidic.

    Rarity:
    Uncommon
    Top Symptoms:
    abdominal or flank pain, nausea, abdominal pain that comes and goes, diarrhea, pelvis pain
    Symptoms that always occur with kidney stone:
    abdominal or flank pain
    Urgency:
    Hospital emergency room
  4. 4.Diabetes Insipidus

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is caused by a lack of, or decreased sensitivity to the hormone vasopressin. Vasopressin is needed for the kidneys to concentrate urine, making sure you do lose to much fluids. If this function is impaired, it will result in urinating frequently and large amounts, extreme thirst and dehydration.

    Can be temporary or permanent.

    Rarity:
    Rare
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, irritability, constipation, excesive thirst, dry mouth
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor

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  5. 5.Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    Anemia is a condition in which the body does not have enough healthy red blood cells. In some cases, this can be caused by an attack of the immune system on the body's own red blood cells.

    Chronic, but curable with relapses and remissions

    Rarity:
    Rare
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, abdominal pain (stomach ache), fever, racing heart beat, joint pain
    Symptoms that never occur with autoimmune hemolytic anemia:
    painful urination
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor
  6. 6.Rhabdomyolysis

    Rhabdomyolysis is a syndrome most commonly resulting from muscle injury following extreme exertion such as endurance exercise or weight lifting or following a severe accident. Sometimes rhabdomyolysis may result from medications - most commonly medications to treat elevated cholesterol such as statins. Severity can range from mild to life threatening kidney disease from muscle enzymes entering the circulation.

    Most patients recover in a few days but occasionally will need prolonged hospital care if the kidneys are injured.

    Rarity:
    Rare
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, nausea, muscle aches, being severely ill, change in urine color
    Urgency:
    Emergency medical service
  7. 7.Low Blood Sodium

    Hyponatremia is a deficiency in sodium. Sodium is one of the most important nutrients in the body, needed for nerves to conduct signals, muscles to contract, and blood pressure to be maintained at safe levels, etc. A deficiency in sodium can cause severe, widespread symptoms.

    1-30 days

    Rarity:
    Ultra rare
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, headache, nausea, loss of appetite, dizziness
    Urgency:
    In-person visit
  8. 8.Non - Specific Change in Urine

    Urine is the product of the kidneys filtering the blood from waste products and excess water. Depending on what you eat, the color and odor of your urine can change. Beets are known to turn urine pink or red, which can be mistaken for blood. Asparagus sometimes gives a distinctive smell. Medication can also change smell and color of your urine.

    If due to diet, your urine will go back to normal color within days, if due to medication it will last as long as the course of the medication.

    Rarity:
    Common
    Top Symptoms:
    a change in either color of odor of urine, frequent urination
    Symptoms that always occur with non-specific change in urine:
    a change in either color of odor of urine
    Symptoms that never occur with non-specific change in urine:
    painful urination, bright red (bloody) urine, fever, frequent urination
    Urgency:
    Wait and watch

Questions Your Doctor May Ask About Change in Urine Color

  • Q.Do you feel pain when you urinate?
  • Q.What color is your urine?
  • Q.Any fever today or during the last week?
  • Q.Have you been feeling more tired than usual, lethargic or fatigued despite sleeping a normal amount?

If you've answered yes to one or more of these questions, try our change in urine color symptom checker to find out more.

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Change in Urine Color Symptom Checker Statistics

  • People who have experienced change in urine color have also experienced:

    • 12% Bad Smelling Urine
    • 4% Vaginal Discharge
    • 3% Abdominal Pain (Stomach Ache)
  • People who have experienced change in urine color were most often matched with:

    • 42% Dehydration
    • 42% Kidney Stone
    • 14% Urinary Tract Infection
  • Source: Aggregated and anonymized results from visits to the Buoy AI health assistant (check it out by clicking on “Take Quiz”).

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