Symptoms A-Z

Always Feel Like You Have to Have a Bowel Movement? This May Be Why

The constant urge to pass a stool is also known as tenesmus and be associated with stomach pain. The constant urge to poop is commonly caused by obstruction or contraction within the intestines, a bacterial infection, or a nerve abnormality in the digestive system. Read below for more information on related symptoms and treatment options.

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Contents

  1. 10 Possible Causes
  2. Questions Your Doctor May Ask
  3. Statistics

10 Possible Feeling Of Needing To Constantly Pass Stool Causes

The list below shows results from the use of our quiz by Buoy users who experienced feeling of needing to constantly pass stool. This list does not constitute medical advice and may not accurately represent what you have.

Normal variation of constipation

Constipation means bowel movements which have become infrequent and/or hardened and difficult to pass.

There is wide variation in what is thought "normal" when it comes to frequency of bowel movements. Anywhere from three times a day to three times a week is considered normal.

As long as stools are easy to pass, laxatives should not be used in an effort to force the body to a more frequent schedule.

Constipation is usually caused by lack of fiber in the diet; not drinking enough water; insufficient exercise; and often suppressing the urge to have a bowel movement.

A number of medications and remedies, especially narcotic pain relievers, can cause constipation.

Women are often affected, due to pregnancy and other hormonal changes. Young children who demand low-fiber or "junk food" diets are also susceptible.

Constipation is a condition, not a disease, and most of the time is easily corrected. If simple adjustments in diet, exercise, and bowel habits don't help, a doctor can be consulted to rule out a more serious cause.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: abdominal pain (stomach ache), nausea, stomach bloating, constipation, constipation

Symptoms that always occur with normal variation of constipation: constipation

Symptoms that never occur with normal variation of constipation: vomiting

Urgency: Self-treatment

Irritable bowel syndrome (ibs)

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic disorder of the large intestine. It is characterized by recurrent abdominal pain and bowel movement issues that can be difficult to treat. Signs and symptoms of IBS are usually not severe or life-threatening, but finding relief may be frustrating.

In order to have a confirmed diagnosis, your IBS should include two of three key symptoms, including improvement of symptoms after defecating, pain that begins when the frequency of stool changes, or(https://www.buoyhealth.com/symptoms-a-z/pain-when-passing-stools/).

Other key symptoms include abdominal pain and discomfort, as well as bloating, cramping,(https://www.buoyhealth.com/symptoms-a-z/fatigue/). These may all be exacerbated by stress, specific foods, or hormonal changes, especially in women.

Treatment focuses on alleviating your symptoms through supplements and medication.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: fatigue, abdominal pain (stomach ache), nausea or vomiting, constipation, stool changes

Urgency: Primary care doctor

Food poisoning

Food poisoning, also called foodborne illness or "stomach flu," is an acute infection of the digestive tract from food contaminated with bacteria, viruses, parasites, or other toxins. It actually has no relation to influenza.

Any food can become contaminated if not prepared under clean conditions, cooked thoroughly, or stored at cold temperatures. Meat, fish, dairy products, and fresh fruits and vegetables are some of the most easily contaminated foods.

Symptoms include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain, and sometimes fever and chills.

Most people recover on their own with supportive care, meaning rest, fluids, and over-the-counter pain relievers and fever reducers.

However, dehydration can result if the vomiting and/or diarrhea are not controlled and IV fluids may be needed.

If there is also blurred vision, dizziness, or paralysis, the nervous system may be affected due to botulism. This is a medical emergency. Take the patient to the emergency room or call 9-1-1.

Proper food preparation and storage, along with frequent and thorough handwashing, is the best prevention.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: nausea, abdominal pain (stomach ache), headache, abdominal cramps (stomach cramps), dizziness

Symptoms that never occur with food poisoning: severe fever, being severely ill, bloody diarrhea

Urgency: Self-treatment

Traveler's diarrhea

Traveler's diarrhea is a digestive tract disorder that commonly causes loose stools and abdominal cramps. It's caused by eating contaminated food or drinking contaminated water.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: diarrhea, nausea, abdominal pain (stomach ache), fever, stomach bloating

Symptoms that always occur with traveler's diarrhea: diarrhea

Symptoms that never occur with traveler's diarrhea: anxiety

Urgency: Self-treatment

Lactose intolerance

Lactose is a sugar that naturally occurs in milk. Someone is considered "lactose intolerant" when the small intestine cannot produce enough of the enzyme that digests lactose called lactase.

In primary lactose intolerance, the enzyme is produced during childhood but declines substantially by adulthood. Secondary lactose intolerance occurs when the small intestine has been damaged by illness or exposure to certain medical treatments. Lactose intolerance most often affects adults of African, Asian, Hispanic, and Native American descent.

Gastrointestinal symptoms, such as gas, bloating,(https://www.buoyhealth.com/symptoms-a-z/nausea/), occur roughly two hours after consuming dairy products, such as milk, ice cream, or yogurt. Lactose intolerance is not dangerous, but the uncomfortable symptoms can interfere with quality of life. Dairy products are an important source of nutrients and their avoidance can lead to nutrient deficiencies.

Treatment typically consists of simply avoiding lactose-containing foods, or replacing the enzyme in order to break down the lactose.

Rarity: Uncommon

Top Symptoms: fatigue, abdominal pain (stomach ache), stomach bloating, constipation, diarrhea

Urgency: Self-treatment

Feeling Of Needing To Constantly Pass Stool Symptom Checker

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Ulcerative colitis

Ulcerative colitis is a chronic, long-term inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract, specifically involving ulcers and sores of the large intestine (colon) and the rectum. Ulcerative colitis often begins gradually and worsens over time with periods of remission interspersed with flare-ups of symptoms.

It is characterized as an inflammatory bowel disease meaning it results in widespread irritation and swelling of the intestines.

Treatments include medications both prescribed and over-the-counter to target certain associated issues as well as surgery.

Rarity: Rare

Top Symptoms: nausea or vomiting, diarrhea, general abdominal pain, fever, back pain

Urgency: Primary care doctor

New onset crohn's disease

Crohn's disease is an inflammation of the bowel. It is caused by a faulty immune system response which makes the body attack the lining of the intestines.

The disease usually appears before age thirty and can affect anyone. Those with a family history may be most susceptible. Smoking is a known risk factor.

Aggravating factors include stress, poor diet, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen and aspirin.

Early symptoms usually develop gradually, but can appear suddenly. These include fatigue, loss of appetite, fever, mouth sores, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and blood in stool.

Untreated Crohn's disease can cause ulcers throughout the digestive tract as well as bowel obstruction, malnutrition, and deteriorating general health.

Diagnosis is made through blood test and stool sample test. Colonoscopy, CT scan, MRI, endoscopy, and/or enteroscopy may also be used.

Crohn's disease cannot be cured, but can be managed through reducing the inflammation. Antibiotics, corticosteroids, and immune system suppressors may be tried. Excellent nutrition, vitamin supplements, smoking cessation, and reduction in stress can be helpful.

Rarity: Rare

Top Symptoms: fatigue, stomach bloating, loss of appetite, constipation, abdominal cramps (stomach cramps)

Urgency: Primary care doctor

Viral (rotavirus) infection

Rotavirus infection is a contagious gastrointestinal virus that most often affects babies, toddlers, and young children. It causes severe watery diarrhea, sometimes with vomiting and fever.

Adults may also be infected, though usually with milder symptoms.

Rotavirus spreads very quickly when any trace of stool from an infected child contaminates food or drink, or gets onto any surface. If another child consumes the food or drink, or touches the surface and then their mouth, the child will become infected.

Rotavirus in adults does not usually need a trip to the ER unless the degree of dehydration is severe but dehydration can set in quickly in children and is a medical emergency. A child can die if not treated immediately. Take the child to an emergency room or call 9-1-1.

Treatment consists of drinking fluids or IV fluids in severe cases and supportive care, usually in a hospital. Antibiotics will not help rotavirus because they only work against bacteria.

The best way prevention is frequent and thorough handwashing, as well as washing toys and surfaces when possible. There is now a vaccine that will either prevent rotavirus infection or greatly lessen the symptoms if the child still gets the virus.

Rarity: Ultra rare

Top Symptoms: diarrhea, vomiting or nausea, nausea, fatigue, abdominal pain (stomach ache), headache

Symptoms that always occur with viral (rotavirus) infection: diarrhea, vomiting or nausea

Symptoms that never occur with viral (rotavirus) infection: constipation, tarry stool

Urgency: Self-treatment

Anal cancer

Most anal cancers are linked to the human papilloma virus, or HPV. However, many people carry HPV and have no symptoms or illness of any kind.

Most susceptible are men who have sexual contact with men; women who have had cervical cancer; and anyone who has engaged in anal intercourse, had anal warts, or is HIV positive. Smoking and lowered immunity are also factors.

Symptoms include minor anal bleeding and itching, which may be attributed to hemorrhoids; pain or fullness in the anal region; and abnormal anal discharge.

It is important to see a medical provider about these symptoms so that if needed, treatment can begin as soon as possible.

Diagnosis is made through patient history; physical examination; anal swab; and biopsy. CT scan, ultrasound, or endoscopy of the anus may also be done.

Treatment involves some combination of surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy depending on the needs of each individual patient.

Rarity: Rare

Top Symptoms: abdominal pain (stomach ache), stool changes, constipation, diarrhea, pain when passing stools

Urgency: Primary care doctor

Colonic neoplasm

Colonic neoplasm means "new tissue" growing in the colon, or large intestine. This neoplasm may be either benign (not cancerous) or malignant (cancer.)

The exact cause of any cancer remains unknown. Risk factors seem to be:

Being over fifty years of age.

  • Family history of the disease.
  • A high-fat, low-fiber diet, typical in the modern world
  • Chronic inflammatory diseases of the colon such as Crohn's disease.
  • Smoking and alcohol use.
  • Diabetes, obesity, and inactivity.

The earliest symptoms are usually polyps, small growths within the colon which can be detected on colonoscopy and removed before they can become cancerous. Later symptoms may be unexplained fatigue; change in bowel habits; persistent abdominal discomfort such as gas or cramps; blood in stool; or rectal bleeding.

Diagnosis is made through colonoscopy and sometimes blood testing.

Treatment is done through surgery, which may be minor or extensive; and through chemotherapy with radiation therapy, usually done before and after surgery. Supportive care to keep the patient comfortable is also an important part of treatment.

Rarity: Rare

Top Symptoms: fatigue, stomach bloating, stool changes, diarrhea, constipation

Urgency: Primary care doctor

Questions Your Doctor May Ask About Feeling Of Needing To Constantly Pass Stool

To diagnose this condition, your doctor would likely ask the following questions:

  • Have you experienced any nausea?
  • Have you had any changes in your weight?
  • Do your symptoms start or worsen when you are dehydrated?
  • Any fever today or during the last week?

The above questions are also covered by our A.I. Health Assistant.

If you've answered yes to one or more of these questions

Take a quiz to find out why you're having feeling of needing to constantly pass stool

Feeling Of Needing To Constantly Pass Stool Symptom Checker Statistics

People who have experienced feeling of needing to constantly pass stool have also experienced:

  • 11% Abdominal Pain (Stomach Ache)
  • 9% Straining While Passing Stool
  • 8% Fecal Urgency

People who have experienced feeling of needing to constantly pass stool were most often matched with:

  • 60% Irritable Bowel Syndrome (Ibs)
  • 20% Normal Variation Of Constipation
  • 20% Food Poisoning

Source: Aggregated and anonymized results from visits to the Buoy AI health assistant (check it out by clicking on “Take Quiz”).

Feeling Of Needing To Constantly Pass Stool Symptom Checker

Take a quiz to find out why you're having feeling of needing to constantly pass stool