Loss of Urge to Urinate Symptoms, Causes & Common Questions

Understand your loss of urge to urinate symptoms, including 4 causes and common questions.

Loss Of Urge To Urinate Symptom Checker

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Contents

  1. 4 Possible Loss Of Urge To Urinate Causes
  2. Real-Life Stories
  3. Questions Your Doctor May Ask
  4. Statistics
  5. Related Articles

4 Possible Loss Of Urge To Urinate Causes

The list below shows results from the use of our quiz by Buoy users who experienced loss of urge to urinate. This list does not constitute medical advice and may not accurately represent what you have.

Dehydration

Dehydration means the body does not have enough water to carry out its normal processes.

Most susceptible to serious dehydration are young children with fever, vomiting, and diarrhea. In adults, some medications increase urination and can lead to dehydration. Anyone exercising vigorously, especially in hot weather, can quickly become dehydrated.

Symptoms include extreme thirst; dry mouth; infrequent, dark-colored urine; dizziness; and confusion. Young children may have sunken eyes, cheeks, and soft spot on top of the skull.

Severe dehydration is a serious medical emergency that can lead to heat stroke, kidney damage, seizures, coma, and death. Take the patient to the emergency room or call 9-1-1.

Diagnosis is made through blood tests and urine tests.

Mild dehydration can be treated simply by drinking extra water, or water with electrolytes such as sports drinks. More serious cases may be hospitalized for intravenous fluids.

It's important for anyone who is outside in hot weather, or who is ill, to drink extra fluids even before feeling thirsty as thirst is not always a reliable guide.

Rarity: Rare

Top Symptoms: fatigue, dizziness, vomiting or diarrhea, racing heart beat, being severely ill

Urgency: Hospital emergency room

Cauda equina syndrome (slow-onset)

Although leg pain is common and usually goes away without surgery, cauda equina syndrome, a rare disorder affecting the bundle of nerve roots (cauda equina) at the lower (lumbar) end of the spinal cord, is a surgical emergency.

Rarity: Ultra rare

Top Symptoms: lower back pain, back pain that shoots to the butt, back pain that shoots down the leg, leg weakness, thigh numbness

Urgency: Hospital emergency room

Loss Of Urge To Urinate Symptom Checker

Take a quiz to find out what might be causing your loss of urge to urinate

Cauda equina syndrome (rapid-onset)

Although leg pain is common and usually goes away without surgery, cauda equina syndrome, a rare disorder affecting the bundle of nerve roots (cauda equina) at the lower (lumbar) end of the spinal cord, is a surgical emergency.

Rarity: Ultra rare

Top Symptoms: lower back pain, back pain that shoots to the butt, back pain that shoots down the leg, leg weakness, thigh numbness

Urgency: Emergency medical service

Acute kidney injury

Acute kidney injury, also called acute renal failure or acute kidney failure, does not necessarily refer to a physical injury. It means that the kidneys have been severely damaged and are suddenly no longer able to filter wastes from the blood.

Anything that interferes with blood flow to the kidneys, or to the urine draining from them, will injure the kidneys. This includes: blood loss; clots; heart disease; high blood pressure; diabetes; infection; dehydration; lupus; toxins; and any number of medications.

An older person who is hospitalized, and/or critically ill, is most susceptible.

Symptoms include decreased urine output; swollen ankles; shortness of breath; nausea; chest pain; and sometimes seizures or coma.

Acute kidney injury is a medical emergency. Left untreated, it can result in permanent kidney damage or death. Take the patient to the emergency room or call 9-1-1.

Diagnosis is made through urine tests, blood tests, ultrasound or CT scan of the kidneys, and sometimes kidney biopsy.

Treatment involves hospitalization to treat the underlying cause of the kidney injury, and may include dialysis.

Rarity: Rare

Top Symptoms: abdominal pain (stomach ache), nausea or vomiting, urinary changes, shortness of breath, fatigue

Symptoms that always occur with acute kidney injury: urinary changes

Symptoms that never occur with acute kidney injury: vaginal bleeding

Urgency: Hospital emergency room

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Questions Your Doctor May Ask About Loss Of Urge To Urinate

To diagnose this condition, your doctor would likely ask the following questions:

  • Pinch the skin on the back of your hand. Does the skin remain pinched like this picture?
  • Is your mouth very dry?
  • Have you been feeling more tired than usual, lethargic or fatigued despite sleeping a normal amount?
  • Do you have dry skin?

If you've answered yes to one or more of these questions

Please take a quiz to find out what might be causing your loss of urge to urinate. These questions are also covered.

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Loss Of Urge To Urinate Symptom Checker Statistics

People who have experienced loss of urge to urinate have also experienced:

  • 5% Lower Back Pain
  • 5% Abdominal Pain (Stomach Ache)
  • 4% Fatigue

People who have experienced loss of urge to urinate were most often matched with:

  • 36% Cauda Equina Syndrome (Rapid-Onset)
  • 31% Dehydration
  • 31% Cauda Equina Syndrome (Slow-Onset)

People who have experienced loss of urge to urinate had symptoms persist for:

  • 33% Over a month
  • 30% Less than a week
  • 15% Less than a day

Source: Aggregated and anonymized results from Buoy Assistant (a.k.a. the quiz).

Loss Of Urge To Urinate Symptom Checker

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