Butt Skin Changes Symptoms, Causes & Common Questions

Understand butt skin changes symptoms, including 8 causes & common questions.

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Contents

  1. 8 Possible Butt Skin Changes Causes
  2. Questions Your Doctor May Ask
  3. Statistics
  4. Related Articles

8 Possible Butt Skin Changes Causes

The list below shows results from the use of our quiz by Buoy users who experienced butt skin changes. This list does not constitute medical advice and may not accurately represent what you have.

Eczema (atopic dermatitis)

Eczema (atopic dermatitis) is a non-contagious chronic skin condition that produces an itchy rash. It is caused by a genetic condition that affects the skin's ability to protect itself from bacteria and allergens. The most susceptible are those with a family hi...

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Non-melanoma skin cancer (squamous cell carcinoma)

Squamous cells are the small, flat skin cells in the outer layer of the skin. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) a type of skin cancer that usually appears as a tiny, painless bump or patch. The most common spots for this cancer are the head (including scalp, lips, ears, and mouth), legs, and the backs of the hands and the arms.

Rarity: Uncommon

Top Symptoms: rash on sun-exposed areas, rash with well-defined border, painful rash, light red or pink bump on skin, scaly rash

Symptoms that always occur with non-melanoma skin cancer (squamous cell carcinoma): rash on sun-exposed areas

Symptoms that never occur with non-melanoma skin cancer (squamous cell carcinoma): fever

Urgency: Primary care doctor

Macrophage activation syndrome

Macrophage Activation Syndrome is a rare, but life-threatening disease caused by rheumatic diseases like Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and Still disease.

Rarity: Ultra rare

Top Symptoms: fatigue, fever, new headache, diarrhea, irritability

Urgency: Hospital emergency room

Irritant contact dermatitis

Irritant contact dermatitis means a skin reaction that is caused by directly touching an irritating substance, and not by an infectious agent such as a bacteria or virus.

Common causes are soap, bleach, cleaning agents, chemicals, and even water. Almost any substance can cause it with prolonged exposure. Contact dermatitis is not contagious.

Anyone who works with an irritating substance can contract the condition. Mechanics, beauticians, housekeepers, restaurant workers, and health care providers are all susceptible.

Symptoms include skin that feels swollen, stiff, and dry, and becomes cracked and blistered with painful open sores.

A medical provider can give the best advice on how to heal the skin and avoid further irritation. Self-treatment can make the problem worse if the wrong creams or ointments are used.

Diagnosis is made through patient history, to find out what substances the patient comes into contact with, and through physical examination of the damaged skin.

Treatment involves avoiding the irritating substance if possible. Otherwise, the person can use petroleum jelly on the hands underneath cotton and then rubber gloves.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: rash with well-defined border, itchy rash, red or pink, rough patch of skin, painful rash, red rash

Symptoms that always occur with irritant contact dermatitis: rash with well-defined border

Symptoms that never occur with irritant contact dermatitis: fever, black-colored skin changes, brown-colored skin changes, blue-colored skin changes

Urgency: Self-treatment

Butt Skin Changes Symptom Checker

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Molluscum contagiosum

Molluscum contagiosum, also called "water warts," is a common, benign, viral skin infection. It causes a rash of bumps that may appear anywhere on the body.

The virus spreads through direct contact with the bumps, including sexual contact. It also spreads through touching any object that an infected person has handled, such as clothing, towels, and toys.

Most susceptible are children under age 10. Other risk factors include dermatitis causing breaks in the skin; a weakened immune system; and living in warm, humid regions under crowded conditions.

Symptoms include a rash of small, pale bumps with a pit in the center. The rash is usually painless but may become reddened, itchy, and sore.

Diagnosis is made through physical examination.

In some cases, treatment is not needed and the condition will clear on its own. However, if the bumps are unsightly or are present in the genital area, lesions can be removed through minor surgical procedures or treated with oral medication or topical agents.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: rash with bumps or blisters, leg skin changes, skin changes on arm, head or neck skin changes, genital skin changes

Symptoms that never occur with molluscum contagiosum: fever, headache

Urgency: Phone call or in-person visit

Lipoma

Lipoma is a word that translates as "fatty tumor," but a lipoma is not cancer. It is simply a growth of fat between the muscle layer and the skin above it.

The exact cause is not known. The condition does run in families and is associated with other unusual syndromes such as adiposis dolorosa, which is similar. Lipomas most often appear after age 40.

Symptoms include a soft, easily moveable lump beneath the skin, about two inches across. A lipoma is painless unless its growth is irritating the nerves around it. They are most often found on the back, neck, and abdomen, and sometimes the arms and upper legs.

It is a good idea to have any new or unusual growth checked by a medical provider, just to make certain it is benign.

Diagnosis is made through physical examination, biopsy, and imaging such as ultrasound or CT scan.

Most of the time, treatment is not necessary unless the lipoma is unsightly or is interfering with other structures. It can be removed through surgery or liposuction.

Rarity: Uncommon

Top Symptoms: skin-colored groin bump, marble sized groin lump, small groin lump

Symptoms that always occur with lipoma: skin-colored groin bump

Urgency: Wait and watch

Non-specific dermatitis (skin inflammation)

Nonspecific dermatitis, or contact dermatitis, simply means inflammation of the skin from many different causes.

Most nonspecific dermatitis is caused by skin contact with a substance that provokes a reaction, which could be anything from plants to soap to jewelry to fabrics. Some may be due to an autoimmune condition, where the body's immune system attacks itself.

Risk factors include a family or personal history of allergies, asthma, or other condition which weakens the immune system; or constant contact with metals, plant life, or chemicals.

Symptoms commonly include red, swollen skin rash with itching, blistering, or oozing, which may become painful and infected.

Dermatitis itself is not contagious but can interfere with quality of life. A medical provider can help with managing the symptoms.

Diagnosis is made through patient history, physical examination, and sometimes skin biopsy and patch testing.

Treatment involves using protective measures if the substances cannot be avoided; making nutritional improvements to strengthen the immune system; using corticosteroid or other creams; and phototherapy.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: red rash, itchy rash, painful rash

Symptoms that always occur with non-specific dermatitis (skin inflammation): red rash

Urgency: Self-treatment

Non-specific skin rash

Common causes of rash are contact dermatitis, sun damage, or allergic reaction. However, many rashes are a symptom of disease and should not be ignored.

Nonspecific rashes have widely varied symptoms:

  • May be flat and smooth; slightly raised or with swollen welts; clean and dry; or blistered and oozing.

May spread widely over the body, or be confined to one site.

  • May appear after eating certain foods; or after exposure to certain plants or to insect stings or bites.

Other symptoms may be present, including pain anywhere in the body; nausea; vomiting; fever; headache; or abdominal pain and upset.

Diagnosis is made through patient history and physical examination to determine the exact type, location, and history of the rash, along with any other symptoms that may be present.

Those symptoms will be investigated with blood tests or imaging. Skin swabs may be taken and tested. After the process has ruled out as many causes as possible, a course of treatment can be determined.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: rash

Symptoms that always occur with non-specific skin rash: rash

Urgency: Wait and watch

Questions Your Doctor May Ask About Butt Skin Changes

To diagnose this condition, your doctor would likely ask the following questions:

  • Any fever today or during the last week?
  • What color is the skin change?
  • Are there bumps on your rash?
  • Is your rash raised or rough when you run your hand over the area of skin?

If you've answered yes to one or more of these questions

Please take a quiz to find out what might be causing your butt skin changes. These questions are also covered.

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Butt Skin Changes Symptom Checker Statistics

People who have experienced butt skin changes have also experienced:

  • 4% Vaginal Itch Or Burning
  • 3% Butt Bump
  • 2% Vaginal Discharge

People who have experienced butt skin changes were most often matched with:

  • 54% Macrophage Activation Syndrome
  • 27% Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer (Squamous Cell Carcinoma)
  • 18% Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis)

People who have experienced butt skin changes had symptoms persist for:

  • 29% Over a month
  • 27% Less than a week
  • 25% Less than a day

Source: Aggregated and anonymized results from Buoy Assistant (a.k.a. the quiz).

Butt Skin Changes Symptom Checker

Take a quiz to find out what might be causing your butt skin changes