Symptoms A-Z

Less Than Normal Urination Symptom, Causes & Questions

Understand your less than normal urination symptoms, including 6 causes & common questions.

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Contents

  1. 6 Possible Causes
  2. Questions Your Doctor May Ask
  3. Statistics

6 Possible Less Than Normal Urination Causes

The list below shows results from the use of our quiz by Buoy users who experienced less than normal urination. This list does not constitute medical advice and may not accurately represent what you have.

Dehydration

Dehydration means the body does not have enough water to carry out its normal processes.

Most susceptible to serious dehydration are young children with fever, vomiting, and diarrhea. In adults, some medications increase urination and can lead to dehydration. Anyone exercising vigorously, especially in hot weather, can quickly become dehydrated.

Symptoms include extreme thirst; dry mouth; infrequent, dark-colored urine; dizziness; and confusion. Young children may have sunken eyes, cheeks, and soft spot on top of the skull.

Severe dehydration is a serious medical emergency that can lead to heat stroke, kidney damage, seizures, coma, and death. Take the patient to the emergency room or call 9-1-1.

Diagnosis is made through blood tests and urine tests.

Mild dehydration can be treated simply by drinking extra water, or water with electrolytes such as sports drinks. More serious cases may be hospitalized for intravenous fluids.

It's important for anyone who is outside in hot weather, or who is ill, to drink extra fluids even before feeling thirsty as thirst is not always a reliable guide.

Rarity: Rare

Top Symptoms: fatigue, dizziness, vomiting or diarrhea, racing heart beat, being severely ill

Urgency: Hospital emergency room

Type 2 diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is also known as adult-onset diabetes, because it is the result of lifestyle and is not hereditary. Diabetes of any type is the condition where the body does not produce enough insulin to process the sugars in food.

Risk factors include obesity, overeating high-carbohydrate foods, lack of exercise, pregnancy, and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS.)

Early symptoms include increased thirst; frequent urination; weight loss despite increased appetite; blurred vision; infections that are slow to heal; and blood sugar somewhat higher than normal.

It is important to get treatment at the first sign of these symptoms, because the high blood sugar levels can cause serious organ damage. Heart disease, neuropathy, kidney damage, and blindness can all result from untreated diabetes.

Diagnosis is made through a series of blood tests to measure blood sugar levels.

Type 2 diabetes cannot be cured, but it can be managed through lifestyle changes. A diet which eliminates refined carbohydrates and controls calories; regular exercise; regular blood sugar monitoring; and sometimes insulin or other medications will all be recommended.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: fatigue, increased appetite compared to normal, vision changes, feeling itchy or tingling all over, excesive thirst

Urgency: Primary care doctor

Hyperparathyroidism

Hyperparathyroidism is a disorder in which the parathyroid glands in the neck are overactive and produce too much parathyroid hormone (PTH). This hormone causes calcium to be released from bones and into the blood.

Rarity: Rare

Top Symptoms: fatigue, abdominal pain (stomach ache), depressed mood, irritability, nausea or vomiting

Urgency: Primary care doctor

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Acute kidney injury

Acute kidney injury, also called acute renal failure or acute kidney failure, does not necessarily refer to a physical injury. It means that the kidneys have been severely damaged and are suddenly no longer able to filter wastes from the blood.

Anything that interferes with blood flow to the kidneys, or to the urine draining from them, will injure the kidneys. This includes: blood loss; clots; heart disease; high blood pressure; diabetes; infection; dehydration; lupus; toxins; and any number of medications.

An older person who is hospitalized, and/or critically ill, is most susceptible.

Symptoms include decreased urine output; swollen ankles; shortness of breath; nausea; chest pain; and sometimes seizures or coma.

Acute kidney injury is a medical emergency. Left untreated, it can result in permanent kidney damage or death. Take the patient to the emergency room or call 9-1-1.

Diagnosis is made through urine tests, blood tests, ultrasound or CT scan of the kidneys, and sometimes kidney biopsy.

Treatment involves hospitalization to treat the underlying cause of the kidney injury, and may include dialysis.

Rarity: Rare

Top Symptoms: abdominal pain (stomach ache), nausea or vomiting, urinary changes, shortness of breath, fatigue

Symptoms that always occur with acute kidney injury: urinary changes

Symptoms that never occur with acute kidney injury: vaginal bleeding

Urgency: Hospital emergency room

Congestive heart failure

Heart failure is a condition in which the heart is no longer able to effectively pump blood to the rest of the body. Heart failure can affect the right side, left side, or both sides of the heart. It can be subcategorized as "heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF)" or "heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF)." The ejection fraction is the portion of blood in the heart that gets ejected through the blood vessels to the rest of the body with each pump. HFpEF is a condition in which the fraction of blood in the heart that is pumped with each beat is normal but the ventricle, one of the chambers of the heart, has been stiffened so does not fill with blood as effectively. HFrEF is a condition in which the fraction of blood ejected from the heart with each beat is reduced.

Rarity: Uncommon

Top Symptoms: cough, fatigue, shortness of breath, cough at night, shortness of breath on exertion

Urgency: Primary care doctor

Right heart failure (cor pulmonale)

Acute cor pulmonale is also called acute right-sided heart failure and acute RHF. It is the sudden failure of the right ventricle of the heart.

The right ventricle pumps blood out of the heart, into the pulmonary artery, and into the lungs. If the pulmonary artery is blocked, the right ventricle will quickly become overworked and in danger of shutting down. A blood clot, called an embolism, or plaque lining this artery can suddenly cut off blood flow from the heart into the lungs.

Risk factors for acute cor pulmonale include surgery, obesity, smoking, and prolonged immobility. All of these leave the person prone to blood clots and/or plaque in the arteries.

Symptoms include sudden chest pain with rapid heartbeat, pale skin, cold sweat, shortness of breath, and coughing, sometimes with blood.

Acute cor pulmonale is a life-threatening medical emergency. Take the patient to the emergency room or call 9-1-1.

Diagnosis is made through physical examination, blood tests, echocardiogram, and chest x-ray.

Treatment involves oxygen, diuretics, blood-thinning and clot-dissolving medications, and sometimes surgery.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: fatigue, chest pain, shortness of breath on exertion, wheezing, decreased exercise tolerance

Symptoms that never occur with right heart failure (cor pulmonale): severe chest pain

Urgency: Hospital emergency room

Questions Your Doctor May Ask About Less Than Normal Urination

To diagnose this condition, your doctor would likely ask the following questions:

  • Have you been feeling more tired than usual, lethargic or fatigued despite sleeping a normal amount?
  • Have you felt excessively thirsty?
  • Have you ever been diagnosed with diabetes?
  • Have you had any changes in your weight?

The above questions are also covered by our A.I. Health Assistant.

If you've answered yes to one or more of these questions

Take a quiz to find out why you're having less than normal urination

Less Than Normal Urination Symptom Checker Statistics

People who have experienced less than normal urination have also experienced:

  • 7% Painful Urination
  • 4% Abdominal Pain (Stomach Ache)
  • 3% Fatigue

People who have experienced less than normal urination were most often matched with:

  • 50% Dehydration
  • 25% Type 2 Diabetes
  • 25% Hyperparathyroidism

Source: Aggregated and anonymized results from visits to the Buoy AI health assistant (check it out by clicking on “Take Quiz”).

Less Than Normal Urination Symptom Checker

Take a quiz to find out why you're having less than normal urination