Symptoms A-Z

Severe Vaginal Pain Symptoms, Causes & Common Questions

Understand severe vaginal pain symptoms, including 6 causes & common questions.

Severe Vaginal Pain Symptom Checker

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6 Possible Severe Vaginal Pain Causes

The list below shows results from the use of our quiz by Buoy users who experienced severe vaginal pain. This list does not constitute medical advice and may not accurately represent what you have.

Bartholin duct abscess

The Bartholin gland sits in the outer part of the vagina and produces fluid that lubricates it. A Bartholin duct abscess is caused by a blockage in the gland and a bacterial infection within the fluid that builds up.

Rarity: Rare

Top Symptoms: vaginal pain, painful sex, bump on the outer part of the vagina, painful vagina lump, small vagina lump

Symptoms that always occur with bartholin duct abscess: bump on the outer part of the vagina, vaginal pain

Urgency: Primary care doctor

Lichen sclerosus

Lichen sclerosus is chronic skin condition in which a person forms patches of white, wrinkly, thin skin, often described as being like "cigarette paper." Most people with this condition will experience it on their anus and genital regions, and some will experience it on other parts of the...

Vaginal bruise

A vaginal bruise occurs when the veins that carry blood from the vagina back to the heart get damaged, causing blood to build up in that area.

Rarity: Rare

Top Symptoms: vaginal pain, vaginal swelling, severe genital swelling, vaginal injury

Symptoms that always occur with vaginal bruise: vaginal injury, vaginal swelling

Urgency: Primary care doctor

Severe Vaginal Pain Symptom Checker

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Enlarged bartholin cyst

The Bartholin gland sits in the outer part of the vagina and produces fluid that lubricates it. A Bartholin cyst is caused by a blockage in the gland and the build up of fluid behind the blockage.

Rarity: Rare

Top Symptoms: bump on the outer part of the vagina, vaginal pain, marble sized vagina lump, large vagina lump

Symptoms that always occur with enlarged bartholin cyst: bump on the outer part of the vagina

Urgency: Primary care doctor

Genital herpes

Genital herpes, or herpes simplex virus 2 infection, is a sexually transmitted disease that causes incurable sores in the genital and rectal areas. The disease is caused by the HSV-2 virus.

Most susceptible are women, as the virus is more easily transmitted from men to women during sex. However, many people carry HSV-2 but are never diagnosed.

  • The virus can be transmitted during sex even by a person with no symptoms.

When present, symptoms include small, painful, blister-like lesions on the genitals and rectum; flu-like symptoms of fever, headache, body aches, and swollen lymph nodes. Before blisters appear, there may be pain and tinging at the site of the outbreak.

HSV-2 cannot be cured, but can be managed to help ease the symptoms and prevent further spread. The virus can be transmitted from a pregnant woman to her baby during the birth process, and anyone with herpes simplex is especially vulnerable to HIV.

Diagnosis is made through physical examination and fluid samples from active lesions.

Treatment involves antiviral medication and always practicing safe sex.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: symptoms of infection, fatigue, muscle aches, fever, penis pain

Urgency: Primary care doctor

Molluscum contagiosum

Molluscum contagiosum, also called "water warts," is a common, benign, viral skin infection. It causes a rash of bumps that may appear anywhere on the body.

The virus spreads through direct contact with the bumps, including sexual contact. It also spreads through touching any object that an infected person has handled, such as clothing, towels, and toys.

Most susceptible are children under age 10. Other risk factors include dermatitis causing breaks in the skin; a weakened immune system; and living in warm, humid regions under crowded conditions.

Symptoms include a rash of small, pale bumps with a pit in the center. The rash is usually painless but may become reddened, itchy, and sore.

Diagnosis is made through physical examination.

In some cases, treatment is not needed and the condition will clear on its own. However, if the bumps are unsightly or are present in the genital area, lesions can be removed through minor surgical procedures or treated with oral medication or topical agents.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: rash with bumps or blisters, leg skin changes, skin changes on arm, head or neck skin changes, genital skin changes

Symptoms that never occur with molluscum contagiosum: fever, headache

Urgency: Phone call or in-person visit

Questions Your Doctor May Ask About Severe Vaginal Pain

To diagnose this condition, your doctor would likely ask the following questions:

  • Have you ever had a yeast infection?
  • Do you feel pain when you urinate?
  • Have you ever taken a course of antibiotics in your life?
  • Have you ever been diagnosed with diabetes?

The above questions are also covered by our A.I. Health Assistant.

If you've answered yes to one or more of these questions

Take a quiz to find out what might be causing your severe vaginal pain

Severe Vaginal Pain Symptom Checker Statistics

People who have experienced severe vaginal pain have also experienced:

  • 9% Vaginal Itch Or Burning
  • 7% Vaginal Discharge
  • 4% Vaginal Pain

People who have experienced severe vaginal pain were most often matched with:

  • 40% Bartholin Duct Abscess
  • 30% Lichen Sclerosus
  • 30% Vaginal Bruise

People who have experienced severe vaginal pain had symptoms persist for:

  • 44% Less than a week
  • 23% Less than a day
  • 14% Over a month

Source: Aggregated and anonymized results from visits to the Buoy AI health assistant (check it out by clicking on “Take Quiz”).

Severe Vaginal Pain Symptom Checker

Take a quiz to find out what might be causing your severe vaginal pain

Disclaimer: The article does not replace an evaluation by a physician. Information on this page is provided as an information resource only, and is not to be used or relied on for any diagnostic or treatment purposes.