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Pink or Red Nose Bump Symptoms, Causes & Common Questions

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Last updated August 27, 2020

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Are you experiencing a pink or red spot or bump on your nose? Causes can range from a common pimple to a severe skin abscess. Read more below to learn about 9 possible conditions that can cause a bump on the nose.

8 most common causes

Wart
Illustration of a doctor beside a bedridden patient.
Hemangioma
Cherry Angioma
Skin Abscess
Illustration of a doctor beside a bedridden patient.
Pimples
Dermatofibroma
Illustration of various health care options.
Atypical mole
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Boil (furuncle)

9 causes of a pink or red nose bump

This list does not constitute medical advice and may not accurately represent what you have.

Wart

Warts, also called common warts or verrucae, are small, rough, rounded growths on the top layer of the skin. They may appear singly or in clusters.

Common warts are caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV) and are contagious through direct contact, especially through a break in the skin. They may spread from one place on the body to another simply through touch.

Anyone can get warts but they are most common in anyone with a weakened immune system, as from illness or chemotherapy. Children and teenagers are also susceptible to warts.

Warts often first appear on the hands and fingers, especially near the nails or after any injury to the skin. This is why biting fingernails is a risk factor for warts.

Warts are benign, meaning they are not cancerous. But they can be unsightly and interfere with normal use of the hands, so treatment is often beneficial.

Diagnosis is made through physical examination. Warts in children sometimes go away without treatment, but otherwise most warts can be easily removed in a doctor's office.

Severe skin abscess

A skin abscess is an infection of the deeper skin that's typically due to bacteria seen on the skin. Recently, infections are more frequently caused by Staph. Aureus (puts the "staph" in "staph infections"). If the infection begins to spread, urgent treatment is required.

You should head to the nearest ER by car since your infection seems like it might be spreading. It is likely that you will be prescribed antibiotics. Surgery may be required to get rid of the whole abscess after the inflammation has died down. Do not drain the abscess yourself.

Rarity: Rare

Top Symptoms: fatigue, fever, painful neck lump, marble-size neck lump, pink or red neck bump

Symptoms that always occur with severe skin abscess: pink or red neck bump, red bump

Urgency: Hospital emergency room

Pimple

Pimples are also called comedones, spots, blemishes, or "zits." Medically, they are small skin eruptions filled with oil, dead skin cells, and bacteria.

Pimples often first start appearing at puberty, when hormones increase the production of oil in the skin and sometimes clog the pores.

Most susceptible are teenagers from about ages 13 to 17.

Symptoms include blocked pores that may appear flat and black on the surface, because the oil darkens when exposed to the air; blocked pores that appear white on the surface because they have closed over with dead skin cells; or swollen, yellow-white, pus-filled blisters surrounded by reddened skin.

Outbreaks of pimples on the skin can interfere with quality of life, making the person self-conscious about their appearance and causing pain and discomfort in the skin. A medical provider can help to manage the condition, sometimes through referral to a dermatologist.

Diagnosis is made through physical examination.

Treatment involves improving diet; keeping the skin, hair, washcloths, and towels very clean; and using over-the-counter acne remedies.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: pink or red facial bump, small facial lump, painful facial bump, marble sized facial lump

Symptoms that always occur with pimple: pink or red facial bump

Urgency: Self-treatment

Hemangioma

A hemangioma is a birthmark that most often appears as a bright red, rubbery nodule of extra blood vessels in the skin. It is sometimes called a "strawberry mark," and it grows within the first year of life.

You can leave the bump alone as it will go away on its own. A pediatrician can check it out on the next routine visit.

Dermatofibroma of the nose

A dermatofibroma is a fairly common skin growth that usually appears on the lower legs, but may appear anywhere on the body. These mole-like growths are benign (noncancerous.)

The cause is not known, though a dermatofibroma may appear after a minor injury. The growths are not contagious.

Dermatofibromas are most common in adults and are rarely found in children.

Symptoms include a hard, raised growth that is red, pink, or brown and less than half an inch across. They are usually painless but may be tender or itchy, and may appear alone or in groups.

Any new growth on the skin should be seen by a medical provider, especially if the growth is very dark in color or changes its shape or appearance quickly.

Diagnosis is made through physical examination and sometimes biopsy.

A dermatofibroma does not require treatment unless it is interfering with clothing or is unsightly. They can be surgically removed, though this will leave a scar and the growth may eventually return.

Rarity: Rare

Top Symptoms: nose itch, small nose lump, skin-colored nose bump, pink or red nose bump, marble-size nose lump

Urgency: Wait and watch

Cherry angioma

A cherry angioma is a noncancerous (benign) skin growth made up of blood vessels.

You do not need to see a doctor for a cherry angioma. If you want to get rid of the spot, a doctor can prescribe propranolol, topical beta-blockers, and systemic corticosteroids on a case-by-case basis.

Boil (furuncle)

A furuncle, also called a boil, is infection of a hair follicle. The infection forms under the skin at the root of the hair and may occur anywhere on the body.

The infection is caused by bacteria, most often Staphylococcus aureus or "staph." Irritation caused by clothes or anything else rubbing the skin can cause the skin to break down and allow bacteria to enter.

Staph bacteria are found everywhere. Frequent and thorough handwashing, and otherwise maintaining cleanliness, will help to prevent its spread.

Most susceptible are those with a weakened immune system; diabetes; and other skin infections.

Symptoms include a single bump under the skin that is swollen, painful, and red, and contains pus.

It is important to treat the boil, since infection can spread into the bloodstream and travel throughout the body.

Diagnosis is made through physical examination and sometimes fluid sample from the boil.

Treatment may involve incision and drainage of the infection, followed by creams to apply to the site of the boil and/or a course of antibiotic medicine.

Rarity: Uncommon

Top Symptoms: pink or red facial bump, small facial lump, painful facial bump, marble sized facial lump, constant skin changes

Symptoms that always occur with boil (furuncle): pink or red facial bump

Symptoms that never occur with boil (furuncle): fever

Urgency: Self-treatment

Atypical mole

Moles are growths on the skin. They happen when pigment cells in the skin, called melanocytes, grow in clusters. Certain moles are considered "atypical" because of their size and characteristics, which require careful watching and possibly even biopsy in order to monitor for development into cancer. Atypical moles, also called dysplastic nevi deserve more attention than normal moles.

You should go see your primary care doctor to examine the mole. He or she can determine if next steps are necessary.

Rarity: Uncommon

Top Symptoms: severe abdominal lump, brown-colored skin changes, moderate abdominal lump, atypical abdominal bump features, growing abdominal bump

Symptoms that always occur with atypical mole: black or brown abdominal bump, atypical abdominal bump features

Urgency: Primary care doctor

Skin abscess

A skin abscess is a large pocket of pus that has formed just beneath the skin. It is caused by bacteria getting under the skin, usually through a small cut or scratch, and beginning to multiply. The body fights the invasion with white blood cells, which kill some of the infected tissue but form pus within the cavity that remains.

Symptoms include a large, red, swollen, painful lump of pus anywhere on the body beneath the skin. There may be fever, chills, and body aches from the infection.

If not treated, there is the risk of an abscess enlarging, spreading, and causing serious illness.

Diagnosis is made through physical examination.

A small abscess may heal on its own, through the body's immune system. But some will need to be drained or lanced in a medical provider's office so that the pus can be cleaned out. Antibiotics are usually prescribed.

Keeping the skin clean, and using only clean clothes and towels, will help to make sure that the abscess does not recur.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: rash with bumps or blisters, red rash, red skin bump larger than 1/2 cm in diameter, pus-filled rash, rash

Symptoms that always occur with skin abscess: rash with bumps or blisters

Urgency: Primary care doctor

Hemangioma (a common, benign skin change)

A hemangioma is a birthmark that most often appears as a bright red, rubbery nodule of extra blood vessels in the skin. It is sometimes called a "strawberry mark," and it grows within the first year of life.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: growing armpit lump, cherry red armpit bump, shrinking armpit lump

Symptoms that always occur with hemangioma (a common, benign skin change): cherry red armpit bump

Urgency: Wait and watch

Questions your doctor may ask about pink or red nose bump

  • Is your nose bump painful to touch?
  • Is the bump cherry red?
  • Is there something coming out of the bump?
  • Any fever today or during the last week?

Self-diagnose with our free Buoy Assistant if you answer yes on any of these questions.

Pink or red nose bump symptom checker statistics

People who have experienced pink or red nose bump have also experienced:

  • 16% Nose Pain
  • 9% Swollen Nose
  • 5% Congestion

People who have experienced pink or red nose bump were most often matched with:

  • 50% Pimple
  • 50% Boil (Furuncle)

People who have experienced pink or red nose bump had symptoms persist for:

  • 36% Less than a week
  • 36% Over a month
  • 11% Less than a day

Source: Aggregated and anonymized results from Buoy Assistant.

Hear what 1 other is saying
I hit my nose HARDPosted August 7, 2020 by K.
I put a ladder on my sister's bunk bed and slammed my face into it by accident a minute later. I have no clue why it's red or got a bump. I was calling it a goose egg, but I haven't been able to find a similar situation anywhere on the internet... I can't put pressure on it, but I'm pretty sure it'll go away and I didn't break my nose. Both of my parents felt it and said that other than the bump, it feels fine. My nose is very stuffy, and it's in pain, but I can't seem to find anything to do except put ice on it and wait it out. It makes wearing my glasses a pain.

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