Read below about abdominal pain that get worse after eating, including causes and common questions. Or get a personalized analysis of your abdominal pain that get worse after eating from our A.I. health assistant. At Buoy, we build tools that help you know what’s wrong right now and how to get the right care.

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A.I. Health Assistant Causes for Abdominal Pain That Get Worse After Eating

The list below shows results from the use of our A.I. Health Assistant by Buoy users who experienced abdominal pain that get worse after eating. This list does not constitute medical advice.

  1. 1.Stomach Ulcer

    A peptic ulcer is a sore in the lining of the stomach or the first part of your small intestine (the duodenum), which causes pain following meals or on an empty stomach.

    2-4 weeks with treatment

    Rarity:
    Uncommon
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, nausea, loss of appetite, moderate abdominal pain, abdominal cramps (stomach cramps)
    Symptoms that never occur with stomach ulcer:
    pain in the lower left abdomen
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor
  2. 2.Acid Reflux Disease (Gerd)

    Acid reflux disease, also known as GERD, occurs when the acidic contents of the stomach come back up into the esophagus. The most common symptoms are heartburn and regurgitation.

    With proper treatment, symptoms may be relieved within days & at most several weeks.

    Rarity:
    Common
    Top Symptoms:
    nausea, sore throat, pain below the ribs, cough with dry or watery sputum, deep chest pain, behind the breast bone
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor
  3. 3.Indigestion (Dyspepsia)

    Indigestion, also known as dyspepsia, is a condition that causes pain or discomfort in the stomach after eating. In some cases, indigestion also causes heartburn, burping, and nausea. Indigestion or dyspepsia is a very common complaint. Every year, about 1 in every 4 people will experience an episode of dyspepsia, of which most cases do not have a serious underlying cause.

    These symptoms are likely to resolve, if they persist you should discuss this with your primary care physician.

    Rarity:
    Common
    Top Symptoms:
    nausea, stomach bloating, dyspeptic symptoms, bloating after meals, vomiting
    Symptoms that always occur with indigestion (dyspepsia):
    dyspeptic symptoms
    Symptoms that never occur with indigestion (dyspepsia):
    vomiting (old) blood or passing tarry stools, rectal bleeding, bloody diarrhea, fever
    Urgency:
    Self-treatment
  4. 4.Irritable Bowel Syndrome (Ibs)

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is very common problem that affects the large intestine. It can cause stomach pain, cramps, bloating, constipation, or diarrhea. Doctors think that IBS is caused by the brain sending wrong messages to the bowels, such as during times of high stress, causing physical changes.

    IBS is a chronic condition that may last for years, but it is not life-threatening and does not damage the bowels or lead to more serious illnesses.

    Rarity:
    Common
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, abdominal pain (stomach ache), nausea or vomiting, constipation, stool changes
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor
  5. 5.Gallstones

    Gallstones are hardened deposits of digestive fluid that can form in your gallbladder. Your gallbladder is a small, pear-shaped organ on the right side of your abdomen, just beneath your liver.

    Curable with surgical treatment, but not necessary unless symptoms begin

    Rarity:
    Uncommon
    Top Symptoms:
    abdominal pain (stomach ache), nausea, loss of appetite, pain in the upper right abdomen, vomiting
    Symptoms that always occur with gallstones:
    abdominal pain (stomach ache)
    Symptoms that never occur with gallstones:
    abdominal pain that improves after passing stools
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor

    Abdominal Pain That Get Worse After Eating Checker

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  6. 6.Colon Damage From Impaired Blood Flow

    A specific type of colon damage, called ischemic colitis occurs when blood flow to part of the large intestine (colon) is reduced due to narrowed or blocked blood vessels (arteries). The diminished blood flow provides insufficient oxygen for the cells in the digestive system. It can cause pain and can damage the colon. Ischemic colitis can affect any part of the colon, but most people experience pain on the left side of the belly area (abdomen). It is most common among people older than age 60. Commonly, ischemic colitis is misdiagnosed because it can easily be confused with other digestive problems.

    Ischemia of the colon has the best prognosis of the ischemic bowel diseases. However, 20% of people develop chronic ulcers as a result. You should make sure to follow up with your doctor to manage the disease and avoid complications.

    Rarity:
    Rare
    Top Symptoms:
    abdominal pain (stomach ache), nausea, loss of appetite, diarrhea, being severely ill
    Urgency:
    Hospital emergency room
  7. 7.Diverticulosis

    Diverticulosis is a condition where small pouches bulge outward through the large intestine (colon). It increases with age, with up to 50% of people over the age of 60 having developed it. Most people don't have symptoms. Eating fiber is shown to reduce the risk of diverticulosis, with vegetarians reducing their risk by half.

    Diverticulosis does not typically go away; however, the risk of complications can be reduced with a better diet

    Rarity:
    Uncommon
    Top Symptoms:
    stomach bloating, diarrhea, constipation, flatulence, incomplete evacuation of stools
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor
  8. 8.Chronic Pancreatitis

    Chronic pancreatitis is a syndrome involving progressive inflammatory changes in the pancreas. This causes permanent structural damage, which can lead to symptoms including abdominal pain, nausea, and diarrhea.

    This is likely a lifelong condition.

    Rarity:
    Rare
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, abdominal pain (stomach ache), nausea or vomiting, loss of appetite, abdominal pain that comes and goes
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor
  9. 9.Celiac Disease

    Celiac disease is an immune disease in which gluten damages the small intestine. Avoid products containing gluten such as wheat, rye, & barley.

    Upon starting a gluten-free diet, nausea and bloating are likely to improve within a few days or weeks. It may take months or longer to feel completely better.

    Rarity:
    Rare
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, stomach bloating, nausea, constipation, diarrhea
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor
  10. 10.Lactose Intolerance

    Lactose intolerance is the inability to fully digest a sugar (lactose) in milk. This results in discomfort, gas, and maybe even stool changes shortly after ingesting a dairy product.

    Indefinite

    Rarity:
    Uncommon
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, abdominal pain (stomach ache), stomach bloating, constipation, diarrhea
    Urgency:
    Self-treatment

Questions Your Doctor May Ask About Abdominal Pain That Get Worse After Eating

  • Q.Have you experienced any nausea?
  • Q.Any fever today or during the last week?
  • Q.Have you lost your appetite recently?
  • Q.Have you been feeling more tired than usual, lethargic or fatigued despite sleeping a normal amount?

If you've answered yes to one or more of these questions, try our abdominal pain that get worse after eating symptom checker to find out more.

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Abdominal Pain That Get Worse After Eating Symptom Checker Statistics

  • People who have experienced abdominal pain that get worse after eating have also experienced:

    • 12% Abdominal Pain (Stomach Ache)
    • 8% Nausea
    • 6% Stomach Bloating
  • People who have experienced abdominal pain that get worse after eating had symptoms persist for:

    • 41% Less Than a Day
    • 34% Less Than a Week
    • 11% Over a Month
  • People who have experienced abdominal pain that get worse after eating were most often matched with:

    • 50% Stomach Ulcer
    • 37% Acid Reflux Disease (Gerd)
    • 12% Indigestion (Dyspepsia)
  • Source: Aggregated and anonymized results from visits to the Buoy AI health assistant (check it out by clicking on “Take Quiz”).

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