Read below about flatulence, including causes and common questions. Or get a personalized analysis of your flatulence from our A.I. health assistant. At Buoy, we build tools that help you know what’s wrong right now and how to get the right care.

This symptom can also be referred to as:
Farting often

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A.I. Health Assistant Causes for Flatulence

Updated on Aug. 29, 2018

The list below shows results from the use of our A.I. Health Assistant by Buoy users who experienced flatulence. This list does not constitute medical advice.

  1. 1.Normal Episode of Gas

    Passing gas, or flatulence, is a natural part of the digestive system. Bacteria in the gut are breaking down food, and as a by product, they release gas. This eventually gets released.

    Indefinite

    Rarity:
    Common
    Top Symptoms:
    flatulence
    Symptoms that always occur with normal episode of gas:
    flatulence
    Symptoms that never occur with normal episode of gas:
    involuntary defecation
    Urgency:
    Wait and watch
  2. 2.Irritable Bowel Syndrome (Ibs)

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is very common problem that affects the large intestine. It can cause stomach pain, cramps, bloating, constipation, or diarrhea. Doctors think that IBS is caused by the brain sending wrong messages to the bowels, such as during times of high stress, causing physical changes.

    IBS is a chronic condition that may last for years, but it is not life-threatening and does not damage the bowels or lead to more serious illnesses.

    Rarity:
    Common
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, abdominal pain (stomach ache), nausea or vomiting, constipation, stool changes
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor
  3. 3.Diverticulosis

    Diverticulosis is a condition where small pouches bulge outward through the large intestine (colon). It increases with age, with up to 50% of people over the age of 60 having developed it. Most people don't have symptoms. Eating fiber is shown to reduce the risk of diverticulosis, with vegetarians reducing their risk by half.

    Diverticulosis does not typically go away; however, the risk of complications can be reduced with a better diet

    Rarity:
    Uncommon
    Top Symptoms:
    stomach bloating, diarrhea, constipation, flatulence, incomplete evacuation of stools
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor

    Flatulence Checker

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  4. 4.Lactose Intolerance

    Lactose intolerance is the inability to fully digest a sugar (lactose) in milk. This results in discomfort, gas, and maybe even stool changes shortly after ingesting a dairy product.

    Indefinite

    Rarity:
    Uncommon
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, abdominal pain (stomach ache), stomach bloating, constipation, diarrhea
    Urgency:
    Self-treatment
  5. 5.Celiac Disease

    Celiac disease is an immune disease in which gluten damages the small intestine. Avoid products containing gluten such as wheat, rye, & barley.

    Upon starting a gluten-free diet, nausea and bloating are likely to improve within a few days or weeks. It may take months or longer to feel completely better.

    Rarity:
    Rare
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, stomach bloating, nausea, constipation, diarrhea
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor
  6. 6.Acute Gastritis

    Acute gastritis is the sudden onset of nausea, vomiting, and/or upper abdominal pain that's caused by inflammation of your stomach lining. If it doesn't go away, this can become an ulcer. Causes include taking a medication that affects the stomach, an infection by a bug called, "H. Pylori", or your immune system reacting to yourself.

    Prognosis is great with the appropriate treatment

    Rarity:
    Uncommon
    Top Symptoms:
    nausea or vomiting, nausea, stomach bloating, loss of appetite, mild abdominal pain
    Symptoms that never occur with acute gastritis:
    fever
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor
  7. 7.Chronic Pancreatitis

    Chronic pancreatitis is a syndrome involving progressive inflammatory changes in the pancreas. This causes permanent structural damage, which can lead to symptoms including abdominal pain, nausea, and diarrhea.

    This is likely a lifelong condition.

    Rarity:
    Rare
    Top Symptoms:
    fatigue, abdominal pain (stomach ache), nausea or vomiting, loss of appetite, abdominal pain that comes and goes
    Urgency:
    Primary care doctor

FAQs About Flatulence

Here are some frequently asked questions about flatulence.

Why do all my farts smell so bad?

Foul-smelling farts (flatulance) can be caused by many things. One of the most common causes of foul-smelling farts is the inability to sufficiently absorb nutrients taken in. This can be because of the diet that one engages in. For example, alcohol can cause in increase in gut motility, causing foul-smelling stools. Infection with different types of diarrheal illnesses can cause foul-smelling stool as a result of either by-products of the bacteria, or incompletely digested foods.

Why do I have excessive flatulence at night?

Excess flatulence is most frequently caused by diet. Diets that include large amounts of milk, sugar, carbonated beverages, or artificial sugar can cause increased flatulence, either by feeding bacteria within the gut that produce gas or by causing less of the food you eat to be absorbed.

Can stress cause gas?

Yes, stress can cause the gut to move food faster than the intestines can digest it, and this can result in abdominal discomfort, bloating, and gas. Usually, in most people, the stress must be prolonged and intense, but in some people even mild stress can cause a significant increase in both gas and the number of bowel movements per day.

What foods do not give you gas?

Foods high in fiber can decrease the amount of gas. Foods low in oils, sugars, artificial sugars, and foods with no milk can decrease the amount of gas you have. Foods that have no gluten may reduce gas in individuals with celiac disease.

How much flatulence is too much a day?

There is no upper limit on the amount of appropriate flatulence daily. The limit is set by your own comfort with the amount of flatulence you have. Simply put, if you feel uncomfortable with the amount of flatulence or the quality of flatulence that you have, then it is a problem worth addressing — first through adjusting your diet and behaviors. The best way to discuss this is with your physician initially, and then through over-the-counter drugs, and, finally, through prescription drugs if necessary.

Questions Your Doctor May Ask About Flatulence

  • Q.Have you experienced any nausea?
  • Q.Do you feel that not all stool has come out after defecating?
  • Q.Were you ever exposed to a dangerous, violent or life-threatening situation?
  • Q.Have you been feeling more tired than usual, lethargic or fatigued despite sleeping a normal amount?

If you've answered yes to one or more of these questions, try our flatulence symptom checker to find out more.

Flatulence Quiz

Flatulence Symptom Checker Statistics

  • People who have experienced flatulence have also experienced:

    • 12% Abdominal Pain (Stomach Ache)
    • 10% Stomach Bloating
    • 5% Nausea
  • People who have experienced flatulence had symptoms persist for:

    • 32% Less Than a Week
    • 25% Less Than a Day
    • 24% Over a Month
  • People who have experienced flatulence were most often matched with:

    • 50% Irritable Bowel Syndrome (Ibs)
    • 50% Diverticulosis
  • Source: Aggregated and anonymized results from visits to the Buoy AI health assistant (check it out by clicking on “Take Quiz”).

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Take a quiz to find out why you’re having flatulence

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