Mild Sore Throat Symptoms, Causes & Common Questions

Understand mild sore throat symptoms, including 8 causes & common questions.

Mild Sore Throat Symptom Checker

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Contents

  1. 8 Possible Mild Sore Throat Causes
  2. Questions Your Doctor May Ask
  3. Statistics
  4. Related Articles

8 Possible Mild Sore Throat Causes

The list below shows results from the use of our quiz by Buoy users who experienced mild sore throat. This list does not constitute medical advice and may not accurately represent what you have.

Viral throat infection

A viral throat infection is an infection of the throat, or pharynx, that is caused by viruses. Viruses are different from bacteria such as Streptococcus pyogenes (which causes "strep throat"). Viral infections are the most common cause of sore throats in children and adu...

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Common cold

The common cold is a viral infection of the upper respiratory tract, which includes the nose, mouth, sinuses, throat, and larynx. There are over 200 viruses that can cause upper respiratory infections, and usually the exact virus behind a cold is never known.

The common cold is, of course, very common...

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New-onset seasonal allergies

New-onset seasonal allergies, also called adult-onset seasonal allergies, are sensitivities to pollen, mold, and other irritants that cause nasal congestion, runny nose, sneezing, itchy eyes, and sore throat.

Seasonal allergies commonly begin in childhood but can start at any age, especially among those with a family history. Moving to a different geographic location may trigger the allergy in someone with a genetic predisposition. Anyone with asthma is more likely to experience adult-onset seasonal allergies.

Sometimes the symptoms are actually from "pregnancy rhinitis" – nasal congestion and sneezing due to the effects of pregnancy hormones on the nasal tissue.

A new-onset allergy is often thought to be a cold, but a cold will clear up without treatment. Allergies persist, never getting better or worse, and can interfere with quality of life.

Diagnosis is made by an allergist, who will use skin tests and blood tests.

There is no cure for seasonal allergies but the symptoms can be managed for greater comfort and relief. Antihistamines, corticosteroid nasal sprays, and immunotherapy or "allergy shots" can be very effective.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: sore throat, congestion, cough with dry or watery sputum, mucous dripping in the back of the throat, fatigue

Symptoms that never occur with new-onset seasonal allergies: fever, yellow-green runny nose, chills, muscle aches

Urgency: Self-treatment

Acid reflux disease (gerd)

GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease) in infants refers to the passage of stomach contents into the throat causing troublesome symptoms, such as feeding intolerance, inadequate oral intake of calories and/or poor weight gain. Vomiting or visible regurgitation ...

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Mild Sore Throat Symptom Checker

Take a quiz to find out what might be causing your mild sore throat

Mononucleosis infection

Infectious mononucleosis, also called "mono" or "kissing disease," can be debilitating for a while but is usually not dangerous in itself.

Several viruses cause mononucleosis. It spreads easily through saliva and other body fluids. Sharing a drinking glass or a spoon, or kissing someone who has the virus – even they show no symptoms – will transmit the disease. It can also be sexually transmitted.

Due to lifestyle, teenagers and young adults seem to be the most susceptible.

Symptoms include tiredness, sore throat, fever, rash, body aches, swelling in the neck and armpits, and sometimes swollen liver and spleen. The symptoms alone are usually enough for the doctor to make a diagnosis.

Because mononucleosis is caused by a virus, antibiotics will not help. Treatment consists of bed rest, fluids, and good nutrition. The patient should still be under a doctor's care due to the risk of secondary infections or damage to the heart, liver, and spleen.

Handwashing, cleanliness, not sharing dishes or drinking glasses, and not having unprotected sex are the best ways to prevent mononucleosis.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: fatigue, headache, loss of appetite, abdominal pain (stomach ache), cough

Urgency: Primary care doctor

Viral infection of the larynx (voice box)

Laryngitis an inflammation of the larynx, or voice box. This causes the vocal cords to swell and leads to a hoarse, raspy voice.

A viral infection, such as the common cold or influenza, is nearly always the cause of laryngitis. These infections are spread through casual contact, as when someone sneezes and the droplets are inhaled from the air.

Most at risk are people whose immune systems are already weakened by illness, medication, or chemotherapy.

Symptoms include hoarseness; sore, irritated throat; difficulty speaking; coughing; and sometimes fever.

Forcing speech during laryngitis can cause permanent damage to the vocal cords. Hoarseness that never really clears up should be seen by a medical provider, as it can be a symptom of a more serious condition.

Diagnosis is made through throat swab and sometimes blood tests.

Treatment involves rest and drinking plenty of fluids until the virus has run its course, and resting the voice so the swelling can subside on its own. Antibiotics are not effective against a viral illness.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: sore throat, runny nose, fever, dry cough, hoarse voice

Urgency: Self-treatment

Strep throat requiring throat swab

Strep throat, or "strep," is a sore throat specifically caused by the bacteria Streptococcus pyogenes, also called group A streptococcus.

The illness spreads when an infected person coughs or sneezes and then someone else inhales the airborne bacteria, or touches a surface where it has landed and then touches their own face.

Children are most susceptible but anyone can be infected.

Symptoms include sudden throat pain, fever, headache, rash, body aches, and red, swollen tonsils. These symptoms can be caused by other illnesses, so a sample is taken by gently rubbing a sterile cotton-tipped swab over the back of the throat.

Testing will identify the organism responsible so that treatment with the appropriate antibiotic can begin. Be sure to finish all of the medication as directed, even after feeling better.

Untreated strep throat can lead to ear infections, kidney disease, scarlet fever, and rheumatic fever. These are serious illnesses. If strep throat is suspected, the person should see a doctor as soon as possible.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: fatigue, nausea, sore throat, fever, rash

Symptoms that always occur with strep throat requiring throat swab: sore throat

Symptoms that never occur with strep throat requiring throat swab: general weakness

Urgency: Primary care doctor

Strep throat needing antibiotics

Strep throat is a bacterial throat infection that can make your throat feel sore and scratchy. Only a small portion of sore throats are the result of strep throat.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: fever, fatigue, nausea, sore throat, muscle aches

Symptoms that always occur with strep throat needing antibiotics: fever, pain with swallowing, sore throat

Symptoms that never occur with strep throat needing antibiotics: general weakness

Urgency: Primary care doctor

Questions Your Doctor May Ask About Mild Sore Throat

To diagnose this condition, your doctor would likely ask the following questions:

  • Any fever today or during the last week?
  • Have you been feeling more tired than usual, lethargic or fatigued despite sleeping a normal amount?
  • Do you have a cough?
  • Have there been changes in your voice?

If you've answered yes to one or more of these questions

Please take a quiz to find out what might be causing your mild sore throat. These questions are also covered.

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Mild Sore Throat Symptom Checker Statistics

People who have experienced mild sore throat have also experienced:

  • 6% Cough
  • 5% Fatigue
  • 5% Congestion

People who have experienced mild sore throat were most often matched with:

  • 33% Viral Throat Infection
  • 33% Common Cold
  • 33% New-Onset Seasonal Allergies

People who have experienced mild sore throat had symptoms persist for:

  • 54% Less than a week
  • 19% Less than a day
  • 11% One to two weeks

Source: Aggregated and anonymized results from Buoy Assistant (a.k.a. the quiz).

Mild Sore Throat Symptom Checker

Take a quiz to find out what might be causing your mild sore throat