Symptoms A-Z

Back Pain That Shoots to The Groin Symptom, Causes & Questions

Understand your back pain that shoots to the groin symptoms, including 6 causes & common questions.

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Back Pain That Shoots To The Groin Symptom Checker

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Contents

  1. 6 Possible Causes
  2. Questions Your Doctor May Ask
  3. Statistics

6 Possible Back Pain That Shoots To The Groin Causes

The list below shows results from the use of our quiz by Buoy users who experienced back pain that shoots to the groin. This list does not constitute medical advice and may not accurately represent what you have.

Chronic low back pain of no specific origin

Low back pain is defined as pain, tightness, and stiffness between the lower end of the rib cage and the buttocks. "Chronic" means the pain has lasted for twelve weeks or longer, and "no specific origin" means the pain cannot be traced to any specific cause, incident, or injury.

Most susceptible are individuals who perform heavy physical work, especially when there is ongoing anxiety, depression, and emotional stress at the same time. The longer the stress and back pain continue, the more difficult it is to ease the symptoms and return the patient to normal functioning.

Treatment involves nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and sometimes opioid medications for pain, though both have risks when used long term. Antidepressants may also be tried, along with psychological counseling.

Corticosteroid injections for the back are effective for some patients, and fusion surgery is sometimes attempted. Lifestyle changes in the form of improved diet, exercise, and stress management are very helpful in most cases.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: lower back pain, unintentional weight loss, back pain that shoots to the butt, fever, involuntary defecation

Symptoms that always occur with chronic low back pain of no specific origin: lower back pain

Symptoms that never occur with chronic low back pain of no specific origin: thigh numbness, buttocks numbness, lower back pain from an injury

Urgency: Primary care doctor

Spinal stenosis

The spine, or backbone, protects the spinal cord and allows people to stand and bend. Spinal stenosis causes narrowing in the spine. The narrowing puts pressure on nerves and the spinal cord and can cause pain.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: lower back pain, back pain that shoots down the leg, back pain that shoots to the butt, difficulty walking, thigh pain

Urgency: Primary care doctor

Paget disease of the bone

Paget disease of bone is also called PDB, osteitis deformans, or osteodystrophica deformans. It is normal for bone cells to renew themselves throughout life, but in PDB the renewal becomes disordered. New bone cells are produced too quickly, causing the bones to become weakened and overgrown.

The cause of PDB is not known. It may be due to an inherited trait combined with certain viral infections.

Symptoms include enlargement, bowing, and abnormal curving of the bones, with pain and tenderness. The skull, pelvis, spine, and upper arms and thighs are most often affected. However, many patients have no symptoms and the condition is discovered while assessing something else.

If not treated, Paget disease of bone can lead to bone deformity; fractures; osteoarthritis; and hearing loss due to changes in the small bones within the ear.

Diagnosis is made through blood tests and an x-ray or CT scan.

There is no cure, but symptoms can be managed with medication, pain relievers, physical therapy, and sometimes surgery.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: new headache, pelvis pain, back pain, spontaneous bone pain, moderate hip pain

Symptoms that always occur with paget disease of the bone: spontaneous bone pain

Urgency: Primary care doctor

Back Pain That Shoots To The Groin Symptom Checker

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Ankylosing spondylitis

"Ankylosing" means a joint has become stiffened and fixed in one position due to injury or disease. "Spondylitis" means inflammation in the joints of the spine. In ankylosing spondylitis, inflammation has damaged the vertebrae of the low back and caused a form of arthritis, leaving the lower spine inflexible.

Symptoms include pain and stiffness in the back and hips, and sometimes in the neck and shoulders. The pain will be worse during sleep and rest.

The diagnosis is made through physical examination and X-rays. Early treatment can help to manage the symptoms, prevent complications, and improve quality of life. Treatment involves non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; new forms of biologic medications; physical therapy; and, in some cases, surgery to repair damaged joints.

Rarity: Rare

Top Symptoms: fatigue, back pain, trouble sleeping, joint pain, hip pain

Symptoms that always occur with ankylosing spondylitis: back pain

Urgency: Primary care doctor

Lower back (sacral vertebral) fracture

A sacral stress fracture is a small break in the sacrum. The sacrum is a large triangular bone at base of the spine. The sacrum connects to the pelvis.

Rarity: Rare

Top Symptoms: lower back pain, back pain that shoots to the butt, back pain that shoots down the leg, severe back pain, lower back pain from an injury

Symptoms that always occur with lower back (sacral vertebral) fracture: lower back pain from an injury

Urgency: Primary care doctor

Vertebral osteomyelitis

Vertebral osteomyelitis, or spinal osteomyelitis, is an infection in the bones of the spine. It usually affects the lumbar, or lower, back, and may be either acute or chronic.

The infection is caused by bacteria, most commonly Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and by some types of fungi. These agents can travel through the bloodstream from an infected wound elsewhere in the body and reach the bones of the spine.

Most susceptible are those with weakened immune systems; poor circulation; recent injury; or undergoing hemodialysis. Osteomyelitis of the spine is the most common form of osteomyelitis in adults, though children can also be affected.

Symptoms include swelling, redness, and pain at the site of the infection, along with fever, chills, and fatigue.

A medical provider should be seen for these symptoms, as vertebral osteomyelitis can progress to abscess and cause further complications if not treated.

Diagnosis is made through blood tests, imaging of the spine, and sometimes biopsy.

Treatment involves several weeks of intravenous antibiotic or antifungal medication, which can be given as an outpatient.

Rarity: Rare

Top Symptoms: upper back pain, spontaneous neck or back pain, fever, foot numbness, upper leg numbness

Urgency: Hospital emergency room

Questions Your Doctor May Ask About Back Pain That Shoots To The Groin

To diagnose this condition, your doctor would likely ask the following questions:

  • Does your back pain radiate anywhere?
  • Any fever today or during the last week?
  • Do you currently smoke?
  • What is your body mass?

The above questions are also covered by our A.I. Health Assistant.

If you've answered yes to one or more of these questions

Take a quiz to find out why you're having back pain that shoots to the groin

Back Pain That Shoots To The Groin Symptom Checker Statistics

People who have experienced back pain that shoots to the groin have also experienced:

  • 17% Lower Back Pain
  • 5% Sharp Lower Back Pain
  • 3% Lower Left Back Pain

People who have experienced back pain that shoots to the groin were most often matched with:

  • 33% Chronic Low Back Pain Of No Specific Origin
  • 33% Spinal Stenosis
  • 33% Paget Disease Of The Bone

Source: Aggregated and anonymized results from visits to the Buoy AI health assistant (check it out by clicking on “Take Quiz”).

Back Pain That Shoots To The Groin Symptom Checker

Take a quiz to find out why you're having back pain that shoots to the groin