Symptoms A-Z

Pain in The Sole of The Foot That Gets Worse in The Morning

Understand pain in the sole of the foot that gets worse in the morning symptoms, including causes & common questions.

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Pain In The Sole Of The Foot That Gets Worse In The Morning Symptom Checker

Take a quiz to find out why you're having pain in the sole of the foot that gets worse in the morning

Contents

  1. 8 Possible Causes
  2. Questions Your Doctor May Ask
  3. Statistics

8 Possible Pain In The Sole Of The Foot That Gets Worse In The Morning Causes

The list below shows results from the use of our quiz by Buoy users who experienced pain in the sole of the foot that gets worse in the morning. This list does not constitute medical advice and may not accurately represent what you have.

Plantar fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis is a common cause of heel pain that occurs due to collagen degeneration and inflammation in the tendons of the foot(https://www.buoyhealth.com/symptoms-a-z/severe-knee-pain/) and hip.

Approximately 2 million people receive treatment for this condition each year.

Many treatment options exist for plantar fasciitis, including rest, specific exercises and stretches, special shoes and orthotics, medications, and surgery.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: pain in the sole of the foot, sharp, stabbing foot pain, pain in one foot, severe foot pain, heel pain

Symptoms that always occur with plantar fasciitis: pain in the sole of the foot, sharp, stabbing foot pain

Urgency: Self-treatment

Chronic idiopathic peripheral neuropathy

Peripheral neuropathy refers to the feeling of numbness, tingling, and pins-and-needles sensation in the feet. Idiopathic means the cause is not known, and chronic means the condition is ongoing without getting better or worse.

The condition is most often found in people over age 60. Idiopathic neuropathy has no known cause.

Symptoms include uncomfortable numbness and tingling in the feet; difficulty standing or walking due to pain and lack of normal sensitivity; and weakness and cramping in the muscles of the feet and ankles.

Peripheral neuropathy can greatly interfere with quality of life, so a medical provider should be seen in order to treat the symptoms and reduce the discomfort.

Diagnosis is made through physical examination; blood tests to rule out other conditions; and neurologic and muscle studies such as electromyography.

Treatment involves over-the-counter pain relievers; prescription pain relievers to manage more severe pain; physical therapy and safety measures to compensate for loss of sensation in the feet; and therapeutic footwear to help with balance and walking.

Rarity: Rare

Top Symptoms: distal numbness, muscle aches, joint stiffness, numbness on both sides of body, loss of muscle mass

Urgency: Primary care doctor

Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia is a set of chronic symptoms that include ongoing fatigue, diffuse tenderness to touch, musculoskeletal pain, and usually some degree of depression.

The cause is not known. When fibromyalgia appears, it is usually after a stressful physical or emotional event such as an automobile accident or a divorce. It may include a genetic component where the person experiences normal sensation as pain.

Almost 90% of fibromyalgia sufferers are women. Anyone with rheumatic disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis or lupus, may be more prone to fibromyalgia.

Poor sleep is often a symptom, along with foggy thinking, headaches, painful menstrual periods, and increased sensitivity to heat, cold, bright lights, and loud noises.

There is no standard test for fibromyalgia. The diagnosis is usually made when the above symptoms go on for three months or more with no apparent cause.

Fibromyalgia does not go away on its own but does not get worse, either.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: fatigue, arthralgias or myalgias, anxiety, depressed mood, headache

Symptoms that always occur with fibromyalgia: arthralgias or myalgias

Urgency: Primary care doctor

Psoriatic arthritis

Psoriatic arthritis is a condition which causes inflammation of the joints. In most circumstances, psoriatic arthritis presents between the ages of 30 and 50 years and occurs after the manifestation of the symptoms of psoriasis, which is a disease of the skin. Psoriatic arthritis typically causes redness, swelling, pain, and stiffness of certain joints. Most commonly, the fingers and toes are affected and may appear "sausage-like." Psoriatic arthritis is predominantly a genetic disease but it can be activated by certain environmental triggers. Avoidance of these triggers could delay or prevent disease onset. Treatment includes symptom management with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and steroids. In more severe cases, other drugs to halt the disease progression such as methotrexate are used.

Rarity: Rare

Top Symptoms: shoulder pain, lower back pain, joint pain, upper back pain, hip pain

Urgency: Primary care doctor

Pain In The Sole Of The Foot That Gets Worse In The Morning Symptom Checker

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Foot sprain

A foot sprain is damage to ligaments within the foot. The term "sprain" refers to overstretching or tearing of ligaments — the strong, fibrous bands of tissue that hold the bones together within the joints. Foot sprains are usually sports or dance injuries. Any sort of running movement that involves sudden stops, starts, and twisting can lead to a foot sprain. Suddenly getting the foot caught while walking or running can wrench the ligaments and cause a sprain.

Symptoms include(https://www.buoyhealth.com/symptoms-a-z/painful-foot-swelling/), bruising, and pain in the affected foot, especially with weight-bearing. If symptoms do not resolve quickly or seem to get worse instead of better, a medical provider should be seen to make sure no fracture is involved.

The diagnosis is made through physical examination and imaging such as X-ray, CT scan, ultrasound, or MRI.

Treatment is usually conservative and involves rest to allow healing; nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for pain; elevating the foot to improve circulation; wrapping the foot with an Ace bandage or wearing a special boot for support.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: pain in one foot, foot injury, limping, warm red foot swelling, swelling of one foot

Symptoms that always occur with foot sprain: pain in one foot, foot injury

Symptoms that never occur with foot sprain: recent cutting accident

Urgency: Phone call or in-person visit

Morton neuroma

Morton neuroma, also called by the older name Morton's neuroma, is a thickening of fibrous tissue in the ball of the foot. This tissue encapsulates the nerve leading to the third and fourth toes. It is not actually a tumor of the nerve, as the name suggests.

The thickening is caused by years of trauma, irritation, and/or compression to the feet. High-heeled shoes, especially if narrow or tight, are a common cause. The condition is most often seen in women over age 45.

Symptoms include burning pain in the ball of the foot, especially with walking or running. The condition will not heal on its own and can lead to chronic foot pain.

Diagnosis is made through physical examination of the foot with simple range of motion exercises, and sometimes x-ray.

Treatment includes changing to better-fitting shoes that do not compress the nerve; using orthotics in the shoes to take more pressure off of the nerve; and in some cases the use of corticosteroid injections.

Rarity: Rare

Top Symptoms: foot numbness, pain in the sole of the foot, pain when touching the foot, pain in both feet, foot injury

Urgency: Self-treatment

Raynaud phenomenon

Raynaud phenomenon, also called Secondary Raynaud syndrome, is a condition that causes small arteries in the skin to abnormally constrict on exposure to cold water or air. This limits blood flow to the hands, fingers, feet, toes, nose, and ears.

Secondary Raynaud syndrome is rare and is caused by another underlying medical condition, often a connective tissue disorder such as rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, or lupus.

Women are more likely than men to be affected, especially if living in cold climates. Family history and smoking are also risk factors.

Symptoms include the hands and feet becoming numb and cold. The skin color changes from pale to bluish, and then to red as the skin warms again.

If not treated, patients may get ulcerated sores or deformities of the fingers and toes, or even gangrene, due to the lack of circulation.

Diagnosis is made through patient history, physical examination, and blood tests.

Treatment includes medications to help increase circulation; treatment of any underlying conditions; and lifestyle changes to gain better protection for the extremities in cold conditions.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: distal numbness, cold toe, cold fingers, spontaneous toe pain, spontaneous finger pain

Urgency: Self-treatment

Friction blister on the foot

Friction blisters are very common among both men and women of all ages. They most commonly affect the feet due to lifting heavy loads, repetitive overuse, or ill-fitting shoes. The layers of skin become separated from mechanical force, and the body fills the gap with fluid.

Rarity: Uncommon

Top Symptoms: foot pain, foot blister, blister likely from friction, constant skin changes, foot skin changes

Symptoms that always occur with friction blister on the foot: foot blister, blister likely from friction

Urgency: Self-treatment

Questions Your Doctor May Ask About Pain In The Sole Of The Foot That Gets Worse In The Morning

To diagnose this condition, your doctor would likely ask the following questions:

  • Have you ever been told you have flat feet?
  • How would you describe your foot pain?
  • What is your body mass?
  • Has a bunion formed on your foot?

The above questions are also covered by our A.I. Health Assistant.

If you've answered yes to one or more of these questions

Take a quiz to find out why you're having pain in the sole of the foot that gets worse in the morning

Pain In The Sole Of The Foot That Gets Worse In The Morning Symptom Checker Statistics

People who have experienced pain in the sole of the foot that gets worse in the morning have also experienced:

  • 3% Lower Back Pain
  • 3% Foot Pain
  • 2% Fatigue

People who have experienced pain in the sole of the foot that gets worse in the morning were most often matched with:

  • 50% Chronic Idiopathic Peripheral Neuropathy
  • 37% Fibromyalgia
  • 12% Plantar Fasciitis

People who have experienced pain in the sole of the foot that gets worse in the morning had symptoms persist for:

  • 32% Over a month
  • 26% Less than a week
  • 22% Less than a day

Source: Aggregated and anonymized results from visits to the Buoy AI health assistant (check it out by clicking on “Take Quiz”).

Pain In The Sole Of The Foot That Gets Worse In The Morning Symptom Checker

Take a quiz to find out why you're having pain in the sole of the foot that gets worse in the morning