Symptoms A-Z

Spontaneous Tailbone Pain Symptoms, Causes & Common Questions

Understand your spontaneous tailbone pain symptoms, including 2 causes and common questions.

This symptom can also be referred to as: coccyx hurts for no reason, tailbone hurts for no reason

Spontaneous Tailbone Pain Symptom Checker

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2 Possible Spontaneous Tailbone Pain Causes

The list below shows results from the use of our quiz by Buoy users who experienced spontaneous tailbone pain. This list does not constitute medical advice and may not accurately represent what you have.

Piriformis syndrome

The two piriformis muscles, left and right, each run from the base of the pelvis to the top of the thighbone. The two sciatic nerves, left and right, are each attached to the spine and run down between the pelvic bone and the piriformis muscle to the back of each leg.

If the piriformis muscle is damaged through sudden trauma, or through overuse as in sports, the resulting inflammation or spasm of the muscle can trap the sciatic nerve between the pelvic bone and the muscle.

Piriformis syndrome is most often found in women over 30.

Symptoms include pain over one or both sides of the low back, and shooting pain (sciatica) down one or both legs.

Diagnosis is made through physical examination and sometimes imaging such as CT scan or MRI.

Treatment involves rest; over-the-counter, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; physical therapy; therapeutic injections; and, rarely, surgery.

The best prevention is a good regimen of stretching before exercise, to help prevent damage to the piriformis.

Rarity: Common

Top Symptoms: pelvis pain, butt pain, pain when passing stools, leg numbness, hip pain

Symptoms that never occur with piriformis syndrome: involuntary defecation, leaking urine

Urgency: Primary care doctor

Spontaneous Tailbone Pain Symptom Checker

Take a quiz to find out what might be causing your spontaneous tailbone pain

Coccydynia

The tailbone, called the coccyx, is the most bottom portion of the spine. Coccydynia is pain around the area of the tailbone, which is triggered by pressure on the tailbone such as during sitting on a hard chair. Symptoms get better with standing or walking. Doctors are not completely sure what causes this pain.

Rarity: Uncommon

Top Symptoms: back pain, lower back pain, painful sex, back pain that shoots to the butt, constant butt pain

Symptoms that always occur with coccydynia: constant butt pain

Symptoms that never occur with coccydynia: warm and red tailbone swelling

Urgency: Self-treatment

Questions Your Doctor May Ask About Spontaneous Tailbone Pain

To diagnose this condition, your doctor would likely ask the following questions:

  • Do your symptoms worsen when sitting?
  • Have you had any changes in your weight?
  • Are you sexually active?
  • While lying down on a firm surface, keep both legs straight. Have a friend slowly raise one leg at a time by lifting your ankle into the air. Do you have pain in that leg before fully raising it to a perpendicular position? (This is called the straight leg test.)

The above questions are also covered by our A.I. Health Assistant.

If you've answered yes to one or more of these questions

Take a quiz to find out what might be causing your spontaneous tailbone pain

Spontaneous Tailbone Pain Symptom Checker Statistics

People who have experienced spontaneous tailbone pain have also experienced:

  • 8% Lower Back Pain
  • 6% Diarrhea
  • 4% Tailbone Pain

People who have experienced spontaneous tailbone pain were most often matched with:

  • 75% Piriformis Syndrome
  • 25% Coccydynia

People who have experienced spontaneous tailbone pain had symptoms persist for:

  • 31% Over a month
  • 27% Less than a week
  • 22% Less than a day

Source: Aggregated and anonymized results from visits to the Buoy AI health assistant (check it out by clicking on “Take Quiz”).

Spontaneous Tailbone Pain Symptom Checker

Take a quiz to find out what might be causing your spontaneous tailbone pain

Disclaimer: The article does not replace an evaluation by a physician. Information on this page is provided as an information resource only, and is not to be used or relied on for any diagnostic or treatment purposes.